Rare baby monkey triplets are rescued after being abandoned by mother

Three rare baby monkey triplets abandoned by their mother were rescued after being found on the edge of a building. One of the triplets was dangling from the awning with its placenta attached to the other monkeys – the only thing preventing it from falling from the hotel in Lopburi province, Thailand on March 10. A passing schoolgirl noticed the little primates and wondered why the newborns were alone. She alerted nearby shopkeeper Somkuan Saosila, 49, who monitored the animals with neighbours in case their mother returned but an hour had passed and the babies were still on their own. Somkuan worried that they could fall from the 10ft-high ledge as the babies move about while they sleep so several neighbours rescued the monkeys. One woman took a long stick to pull the animals while another held a basket right below them in case they fell. The two good Samaritans had difficulty grabbing the babies from the ledge using only the stick so they borrowed a ladder from one of the shops. After almost half an hour, the triplets were rescued and rushed to a veterinary clinic where they were cleaned and fed with milk formula. The vet who is now nursing them back to health, Jutamas Suphanam, said the baby monkeys were uninjured aside from dehydration as they had not eaten for several hours since being born. She said: ‘They were very fragile as they had not eaten since the mother gave birth but we gave them medicine and food to gain strength and grow up healthy.’ The baby monkeys were all females weighing between 350 to 400 grams and were named Jane, Noon and Bow after a pop Thai girl group band ‘Super Valentine.’ The animal doctor added that triplet monkeys are extremely rare and the mother could have been in a lot of pain giving birth, which lead to her being expelled from the troop before abandoning the babies. She said: ‘Triplet monkeys are rare. Their mother could have made a loud noise due to labour pains and was expelled by fellow monkeys which could be why she ended up giving birth on the hotel then leaving them there.’ The baby monkeys will have to be nurtured for at least 60 days before they are allowed to move on their own. It will take up to a year before they can be released. Jutamas said she will take care of the triplets until they are ready to be released back to the wild as she had a dream the day before about adopting baby girls. She said: ‘It’s amazing that the dream came true. I’m willing to raise these girls and I’ll give them a wonderful life.’ Lopburi, around 95 miles north of the capital Bangkok, has a large population of wild monkeys that roam the streets and buildings. Locals believe they are lucky and pay respect to them with a festival every year.