Reports: Trump state visit on hold until British public supports it

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US President Donald Trump has reportedly told Theresa May he will not make a state visit to Britain until there is support for it from the British public.

President Trump told the beleaguered Prime Minister in a phone call that he does not want to come if his arrival will be met by protests, the Guardian reported.

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The comments, said to have been made in recent weeks, mean any visit to the UK by the US president is effectively on hold.

The Guardian attributed the information to a Downing Street adviser who was in the room at the time.

Donald Trump has reportedly told Theresa May he will not make a state visit to the UK unless the British public supports it
Phone call – According to the Guardian, President Trump delivered the news to Mrs May in recent weeks (Pictures: Getty)

Responding to the claim, a White House spokeswoman said: “The president has tremendous respect for Prime Minister May. That subject never came up on the call.”

Downing Street refused to comment, saying only that the invitation which was given by Mrs May on behalf of the Queen when she met Mr Trump in Washington just seven days after his inauguration, remained unchanged.

The Prime Minister had faced calls to cancel Donald Trump’s planned visit after the US President launched a Twitter attack on London Mayor Sadiq Khan in the wake of the London Bridge terror attack, wrongly claiming he had said there was “no reason to be alarmed.

Mr Trump later said Mr Khan had given a “pathetic excuse” for his comments, again falling under fire.

The comments led to calls for Mrs May to cancel any visit from Mr Trump, as she was accused of failing to directly criticised the president’s comments.

Critics included Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron, who brand the US president an “embarrassment to America”.

Senior Labour MP David Lammy also called for the state visit to be cancelled, calling for Mrs May to “show some bottle”.

President Trump was among several leaders to call Mrs May to “congratulate” her on returning to Downing Street.

A Downing Street spokesman said: “Donald Trump called the Prime Minister to offer his congratulations. Both sides agreed they look forward to continuing the close cooperation between our two countries.”

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn previously hinted that he could delay Mr Trump’s visit to Britain – originally thought to be set for October – if he was elected Prime Minister.

In an interview with The Independent, Mr Corbyn said he was “very concerned” about the speed that Mr Trump had received his invitation from Mrs May – which came just seven days after she took office.

His predecessor Barack Obama was only extended the invitation by former PM David Cameron more than 800 days into his administration.

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