Rescue centre says farewell to wildlife manager of 14 years

·2-min read
New manager Rachel Morrell with some of the animals rescued at Oak and Furrows
New manager Rachel Morrell with some of the animals rescued at Oak and Furrows

A local wildlife rescue centre says it is delighted to welcome its new Wildlife Centre Manager

Rachel Morrell has joined RSPCA Oak and Furrows Rescue Centre bringing with her a wealth of experience and skills in wildlife care.

Her predecessor, Richard Moulding, had worked at the Blakehill Nature Reserve site for fourteen years before he stepped away from the position earlier this year.

Rachel said: "I am thrilled to be joining the team of staff and volunteers who do such amazing work.

"I have a lifelong passion for animals which started with my first animal rescue service collecting snails and slugs from neighbours' gardens – an early venture at around 8 years of age!

"I was blessed with a life full of animals as my Mum was a veterinary nurse before moving on to teach animal care in a local college. While studying Psychology at Bournemouth University I learnt how important connecting with animals and nature was to well-being and the positive impact this can have.

"I have always been concerned with the impact of humans on the natural world and feel it is our duty to reset the balance wherever possible so that we can share ecosystems more sustainably.

"This is an ethos that we all share at the centre.

"I look forward to working with the team and the community to promote and support the care of wildlife in our area."

The former centre manager, Richard, had been at RSCPA Oak and Furrows for fourteen years after first starting as a volunteer. His first job was cleaning out the drains.

Swindon Advertiser: Richard Moulding at RSPCA Oak and Furrows
Swindon Advertiser: Richard Moulding at RSPCA Oak and Furrows

Richard Moulding at RSPCA Oak and Furrows

In a post on the charity's Facebook page, Richard's departure was announced with a tribute: "But that wasn't all he did. Being able to turn his hand to everything from caring for animals, triaging, treating, feeding and getting covered in poop, building things, mending things, programming computers, all the boring managerial stuff, helping us with rudimentary arithmetic, and being a shoulder to cry on and making countless cups of tea!"

The centre continues to see an increase in contacts from the public and has supported nearly 4000 patients this year many of which needed specialist knowledge, care and food.  To find out more about how you can help visit its website www.rspcaoandf.org.uk