New Research Shows 'Quickies' Aren't The Answer To Getting Pregnant

A fertility study has suggested the more you enjoy yourself, the more likely conception becomes
A fertility study has suggested the more you enjoy yourself, the more likely conception becomes

A fertility study has suggested the more you enjoy yourself, the more likely conception becomes

When you’re trying to get pregnant, it can be easy to assume the best way to up your chances of conception is to quickly bash one out with your partner whenever there’s an opportunity to do so during your fertile window.

However, according to findings from a new fertility study, ‘quickies’ are not the answer.

The research, which was published in the journal Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, revealed men recorded a higher sperm count (and made the chances of their partner getting pregnant more likely), the more they focused on “enjoying themselves”.

According to the study: “Some studies suggest that ejaculates obtained from intercourse are of higher quality (by several measures) compared to ejaculates obtained by masturbation – this could be attributed to the increased intensity and duration of sexual arousal achieved during intercourse.”

To put it simply, the higher the sexual arousal a man experiences, the better the quality of sperm he produces, the more likely conception is.

Co-author Allan Pacey, professor of men’s health at the University of Sheffield, said: “This study reinforces the view that having good sex can help couples trying to conceive a baby.

“It is not just about having a quickie on the day of the month when the woman is ovulating. There is growing evidence men produce better sperm samples for conceiving when they are more aroused.”

In the study, sperm counts increased by up to 58% when researchers gave men virtual reality (VR) pornography to watch – as they felt as if they were taking part in the experience compared with traditional video and printed material.

While the study used pornography, a fertility expert involved in the research has claimed the results would apply to sex – but admitted more research was needed.

Related...