Resident Evil: Infinite Darkness gets first trailer ahead of Netflix release

·2-min read

The new trailer for the Resident Evil show, based the award-winning zombie survival games, has been released by Netflix.

It joins a growing list of popular video games including The Last Of Us and Uncharted in heading for big and small screen remakes in the coming months.

Resident Evil: Infinite Darkness will follow the stories of characters Leon S Kennedy and Claire Redfield around two years after the events of the Resident Evil 4 game, which was first released in 2005.

Hailing new technologies in filmmaking, the anime show will contend with zombie attacks, a mysterious villain and political conspiracies.

The trailer shows the two protagonists dealing with a fresh zombie outbreak and pushing the US government to reveal more information - but are soon shut down.

We also see a brand new monster-looking villain, who promises to terrify the heroes and viewers alike.

Resident Evil is one of the most recognisable and popular game franchises in the world, spawning more than half a dozen instalments thus far - plus a film series spanning 2002 to 2017.

More than 100 million copies of the games have been shifted worldwide, with YouTubers and streamers alike often featuring the zombie-horror-survival games on their channels.

The first Resident Evil was released in 1996 on the PlayStation, and will soon celebrate its 25th anniversary.

The latest game - Resident Evil Village - was just launched earlier this month, and the new Netflix series will also be released at some point in 2021.

The adaptation of Uncharted, starring Spider-Man actor Tom Holland, will hit big screens in 2022.

And The Last Of Us, based on the PlayStation game of the same name and featuring Mandalorian star Pedro Pascal, could launch on HBO Max as early as this year.

The projects continue a resurgence in video game adaptions after 2019's Pokemon: Detective Pikachu film, 2020's Sonic The Hedgehog, and 2021's Mortal Kombat.

Game-based films in years gone by had mostly been critical flops, including blockbusters based on Tomb Raider and World Of Warcraft.