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Revisiting the assassination of JFK

President John F. Kennedy, front, right, exits the Hotel Texas in Fort Worth, at 8:45 a.m., Nov. 22, 1963. He is on his way to greet crowds and make a speech. At right holding hat and wearing raincoat is Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. (Photo: AP)

Revisiting the assassination of JFK, as more of the last files are opened

Nov. 22, 1963, was one of the darkest days in our nation’s history, when a young president who had captured the imagination of the world was gunned down sitting with his wife in a motorcade driving through the heart of Dallas, Texas. The assassination of John F. Kennedy shook the confidence of a country that had emerged less than a generation earlier, triumphant from World War II, and set the stage for the social upheavals of the rest of the decade. The official explanation for the assassination was that a nonentity named Lee Harvey Oswald had carried off the murder entirely on his own — for reasons that have never been fully explained. This left many Americans unsatisfied and gave rise to the modern industry of conspiracy-mongering that still defines much of American political discourse.

The various investigations and reports on the case amounted to uncounted millions of words, some of which have been locked away in government archives for more than half a century, holding secrets that could never have seen the light of day during the Cold War. It’s hard to imagine that they contain new information that will make a difference to anyone still living. But to professional researchers, historians and the undying band of assassination buffs still poring over the film shot by Abraham Zapruder in Dealey Plaza — and to ordinary citizens who care about their country’s history and the integrity of its political institutions — the promise of clearing up the remaining questions about that awful day in 1963 is a matter of consuming interest.

The National Archives is releasing another 676 government documents related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. It’s the third public release so far this year.

Last week, President Donald Trump ordered all remaining records released to the public. He also directed agencies to take another look at their proposed redactions and only withhold information in the rarest of circumstances.

This represents the first in a series of rolling releases pursuant to Trump’s directive.

Most of Friday’s release comprises 553 records from the CIA that previously were withheld in their entirety. There also are records from the Justice and Defense departments, the House Select Committee on Assassinations and the National Archives. (Yahoo News/AP)

Here’s a look back at that dark day.

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