• Hackney domestic violence charity faces battle to stay in premises
    News
    The Guardian

    Hackney domestic violence charity faces battle to stay in premises

    Hackney domestic violence charity faces battle to stay in premisesSistah Space, London’s only service for women of African and Caribbean heritage, faces a return to building it says is unsafe * Coronavirus – latest updates * See all our coronavirus coverage

  • Even during pandemic beekeeping remains an essential service
    News
    Associated Press

    Even during pandemic beekeeping remains an essential service

    WASHINGTON (AP) — “Excuse me, can I ask what you’re doing here?” a resident in a southeast Washington neighborhood asks as Sean Kennedy and Erin Gleeson get out of their truck and scour the streets. Kennedy, 58, and Gleeson, 36, are beekeepers. “Let’s check the alley,” Kennedy says, and quickly they’re back in their truck.

  • Murder mystery on HS2 route as Iron Age man found buried face down with hands bound
    Science
    The Independent

    Murder mystery on HS2 route as Iron Age man found buried face down with hands bound

    A mysterious death is being investigated as a potential murder in Buckinghamshire after an Iron Age man was discovered buried face down with his hands bound along the proposed route for the nation’s second high-speed rail route.The skeleton, found alongside discoveries spanning a 4,000 year period from the Neolithic Age to the Middle Ages, was found with his hands tied under his pelvis during excavation work at Wellwick Farm near Wendover.

  • How Covid-19 can damage the brain
    Health
    France 24

    How Covid-19 can damage the brain

    Not only does Covid-19 damage the lungs, heart and kidneys, it can also cause severe brain damage – with patients suffering neurological conditions including paranoia and hallucinations, a British scientific study has revealed.Following her discharge from hospital after being treated for symptoms of Covid-19, a 55 year-old British woman started hallucinating, seeing monkeys and lions in her house. She started suffering from a persecution complex, and was possessed by a compulsion to repeatedly take off and put on her coat.She was one of 43 patients with severe neurological complications from Covid-19 studied by British scientists, for a study published on July 8 in the neurological publication Brain. This report reinforced the growing scientific consensus about the severe brain damage the coronavirus can cause.“We had to wait for the virus to come over to Europe from China before scientists in Italy could tell us about its neurological effects,” said Pierre-Marie Lledo, director of the Department of Neuroscience at the Institut Pasteur, the renowned medical research centre in Paris. At the outset of the pandemic, the first salient finding in this domain was the loss of taste and smell amongst those suffering from the coronavirus.‘Repercussions on the brain’The new study “makes it possible to the see more clearly the kind of neurological damage Covid-19 causes”, Lledo noted. There is a wide variety of problems it creates. The British scientists behind the Brain study have found that it can provoke strokes, different types of encephalitis, ADEM (an acute inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that usually affects children), and Guillan Barré syndrome (a condition that attacks the nervous system and causes paralysis).These complications – which only seem to affect a small number of those infected with the virus – can occur up to six days before and 14 days after the onset of the more common Covid-19 symptoms such as a dry cough or fever.>> For some survivors, coronavirus complications can last a lifetimeThese findings suggest that Covid-19 has a “neurotropic inclination, meaning that it attacks neurons”, Lledo continued. The best-known neurotropic virus is rabies, which attacks the central nervous system almost exclusively. The fact that Covid-19 is primarily a respiratory illness in no way prevents it from having this neurological aspect.“We know that the receptor which allows Covid-19 to enter cells is present in the respiratory tract, but it is also present in cells of other organs, such as the brain and liver,” said Nicholas Locker, a professor of virology at the University of Surrey. “It’s quite common for a virus to be able to migrate, so it’s not surprising that Covid-19 causes brain damage,” he continued.Covid-19 is not the first case of a virus that attacks the brain. One of previous pandemics to take the world by storm, the 1918-19 Spanish flu, caused serious neurological complications. Similarly, the Zika virus, which travels through the blood, has been shown to cause forms of brain damage such as microcephaly. During previous pandemics of coronaviruses – such as SARS in 2002 and MERS in 2012 – “there were signs of repercussions on the brain, although not enough” for a sufficiently clear picture, Lledo said.Possibility of ‘chronic’ consequencesWhat surprised the British researchers was that, for some of the hospitalised patients, “the pulmonary symptoms were relatively weak, while the neurological symptoms were severe”, Lledo said. This was notably the case for a woman in her sixties, already suffering from symptoms of cognitive decline, who was admitted to the hospital after a series of hallucinations. The damage to her brain was worse than the damage to her lungs.However, the British study doesn’t give any indications as to whether people who are asymptomatic or are showing only mild symptoms risk developing serious neurological complications. “The researchers were looking specifically at what was happening in patients who were already very ill,” Locker said. The sample size was also too small to allow scientists to make an assessment on this point.The fact that some of these patients developed neurological complications up to two weeks after the onset of symptoms of Covid-19 suggests that “we’ll need to monitor patients more closely after they’ve hospital to take this risk into account”, Locker noted.The study also called for further investigations into the effects of Covid-19 on the brain. Locker argued that it would be necessary to find out if “Covid-19 symptoms are worse for people who are likely to develop neurodegenerative diseases”.In doing so, scientists would determine whether or not such people should be included in group sheltered from the virus because of their elevated health risks, such as those with diabetes and respiratory diseases.The great fear this study raises is the possibility that “Covid-19 could have chronic neurological consequences”, Lledo said. He noted that, “for reasons that are still mysterious to us, certain symptoms of Covid-19 seem to recur in some people”. Notably one of the main risks – currently being examined in pan-European research – is that the coronavirus can trigger chronic fatigue syndromes.This article was adapted from the original in French.

  • Fox Business Flash top headlines for July 11
    News
    FOX News Videos

    Fox Business Flash top headlines for July 11

    Fox Business Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on FoxBusiness.com.

  • SpaceX launch aborted: 10th Starlink mission cancelled to 'allow more time for checkouts'
    Science
    The Independent

    SpaceX launch aborted: 10th Starlink mission cancelled to 'allow more time for checkouts'

    SpaceX has once again stood down from its 10th Starlink mission to deliver internet satellites into orbit.Lift-off was scheduled for 10.54am local time (3.54pm BST) from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Saturday, with weather looking favourable before it was cancelled.

  • Science
    Sky News

    Skeleton of 'murdered' Iron Age man found during HS2 works in Buckinghamshire

    The skeleton of a man with his hands tied - believed to be a murder victim from the Iron Age - has been discovered by archaeologists working on the HS2 project. The remains were found during excavations at Wellwick Farm in Buckinghamshire, ahead of construction work for the high-speed rail line. Experts said the skeleton was buried face down in a ditch with his hands bound together under his pelvis, suggesting he may have been the victim of a murder or execution.

  • Facebook working on neck patches measuring muscle movement to give VR users Jedi-like powers
    Technology
    Evening Standard

    Facebook working on neck patches measuring muscle movement to give VR users Jedi-like powers

    Facebook is developing “wearable patches” designed to be stuck on the neck of virtual reality users for them to communicate with the twitch of a muscle.The social media giant wants to more accurately convey how the human body appears to others in the digital world by interpreting how brain signals influence the smallest of movements.

  • Skeleton of Iron Age murder victim unearthed during HS2 works in Buckinghamshire
    Science
    Evening Standard

    Skeleton of Iron Age murder victim unearthed during HS2 works in Buckinghamshire

    A skeleton believed to be a murder victim from the Iron Age has been discovered by archaeologists working on the HS2 project in Buckinghamshire.HS2 said that the grisly find was unearthed during the excavation work at Wellwick Farm near Wendover when the archaeologists found the skeleton of an adult male buried face down in a ditch with hands bound together under his pelvis.

  • The quest to find signs of ancient life on Mars
    Science
    AFP

    The quest to find signs of ancient life on Mars

    Mars may now be considered a barren, icy desert but did Earth's nearest neighbour once harbour life?

  • Amazon email telling staff to delete TikTok app was 'sent in error'
    Business
    Sky News

    Amazon email telling staff to delete TikTok app was 'sent in error'

    Amazon has said it mistakenly sent an email to employees telling them to delete the popular video app TikTok from their phones. Amazon had told employees to delete the popular video app from phones on which they use Amazon email, citing "security risks" from the China-owned service. "The TikTok app is no longer permitted on mobile devices that access Amazon email," the notice read, which was sent on Friday, according to an employee who is not authorised to speak publicly.

  • 4,000 years of human history: HS2 works reveal Iron Age skeleton among 'wealth of archaeology'
    Science
    The Telegraph

    4,000 years of human history: HS2 works reveal Iron Age skeleton among 'wealth of archaeology'

    A skeleton believed to be a murder victim from the Iron Age has been discovered by archaeologists working on the HS2 project in Buckinghamshire. HS2 said the grisly find was unearthed during the excavation work at Wellwick Farm near Wendover when the archaeologists found the skeleton of an adult male buried face down in a ditch with hands bound together under his pelvis. The unusual burial position suggests the Iron Age man may have been a victim of a murder or execution, it said. Osteologists are examining the skeleton for further evidence of foul play. Other discoveries at the site span more than 4,000 years of human history, including a circular timber monument resembling the layout of Stonehenge.

  • Elon Musk claims mysterious brain chip will be able to cure depression and addiction: ‘It’s both great and terrifying’
    Technology
    The Independent

    Elon Musk claims mysterious brain chip will be able to cure depression and addiction: ‘It’s both great and terrifying’

    Elon Musk has revealed more details about his mysterious brain-computer chip startup Neuralink, claiming that it could be used to help cure addiction and depression.Mr Musk founded Neuralink in 2016, though few details about how the technology will work have been revealed. After receiving more than $158m (£125m) in funding, Neuralink announced in a 2019 presentation that it had developed a “sewing machine-like” device capable of connecting brains directly to computers.

  • HS2 unearths skeleton of Iron Age murder victim
    Science
    PA Media: UK News

    HS2 unearths skeleton of Iron Age murder victim

    The unusual burial position suggests the iron age man may have been a victim of a murder or execution.

  • HS2 works uncover skeleton of man ‘murdered or executed during Iron Age’
    Science
    PA Media: UK News

    HS2 works uncover skeleton of man ‘murdered or executed during Iron Age’

    Archaeological works are being carried out on the route of the HS2 high-speed railway.

  • Amazon mistakenly tells workers to take TikTok app off phones
    News
    AFP

    Amazon mistakenly tells workers to take TikTok app off phones

    Amazon on Friday said it mistakenly sent workers an email telling them to dump the TikTok mobile application from their cell phones because of security concerns.

  • Technology
    Associated Press

    Facebook's software kit to blame for popular apps crashing

    Friday's widespread crashes of popular apps running on the iPhone’s iOS operating system — including Tinder, Spotify and Pinterest — serve as a reminder that Facebook is still tracking you through your phone using sophisticated software, even if you're not browsing the social network. Facebook attributed the problem, which was quickly fixed, to a bug in its software development kit, or SDK, a tool developers use to integrate their apps with Facebook. The integration allows people to use their Facebook credentials to log in to apps for dating, music or anything else.

  • Amazon says email to employees banning TikTok was a mistake
    Business
    PA Media: World News

    Amazon says email to employees banning TikTok was a mistake

    The app is popular with young people, including millions of American users, but is the subject of national security concerns.

  • Amazon walks back TikTok ban after sending employees email 'in error'
    Business
    The Independent

    Amazon walks back TikTok ban after sending employees email 'in error'

    Amazon has walked back an employee mandate to delete Chinese app TikTok from mobile phones, saying the direction sent on Friday morning was “in error”.In a statement to The Independent, an Amazon spokesperson confirmed employees would still be able to use the app on phones that accessed company email services.

  • Celebrity Gogglebox stars hilariously struggle to turn off a phone
    Technology
    Digital Spy

    Celebrity Gogglebox stars hilariously struggle to turn off a phone

    "Hey, Siri, turn the f**king phone off."

  • Twitter founder Jack Dorsey donates $3m to universal basic income scheme in US cities
    News
    The Telegraph

    Twitter founder Jack Dorsey donates $3m to universal basic income scheme in US cities

    Twitter boss Jack Dorsey has backed a scheme to provide US citizens with a universal basic income. He has invested $3m (£2.4m) in the initiative, which is being tested by mayors of 16 cities in the United States. The scheme is “one tool to close the wealth and income gap,” the billionaire said. Mayors for Universal Basic Income was launched on June 29 by Michael Tubbs, the mayor of Stockton, California. The 29-year-old has been running a pilot there since 2018, paying $500 (£386) a month to 125 residents. The merits of a universal basic income have been debated for some time and the idea was reportedly on the table during the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic, as the Treasury brainstormed how to shelter Britons from the resulting economic shutdown. Proponents argue that it is the best way to guarantee a fair standard of living for the entire population and protect them from sudden economic shocks, like a pandemic, or the rise of artificial intelligence and automation, which is expected to accelerate layoffs in several industries. Giving every family a monthly stipend would also lower a government's costs as it would not need to monitor benefit fraud or carry out means testing. In May, Mr Dorsey gave $5m to an organisation founded by former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang to build the case for universal basic income. The idea has also been endorsed by Elon Musk, Richard Branson and Mark Zuckerberg. However, Finland cancelled a pilot involving 2,000 citizens after two years, after recipients remained jobless. Dorsey’s pledge is part of the $1bn he has committed to help fight the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, which represents around 28pc of his wealth. The non-profit, Start Small, has already backed America’s Food Fund, a project launched by actor Leonardo di Caprio and Laurene Powell Jobs, widow of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.

  • Points of Progress: Fiji reefs restored with traditional knowledge, and more
    News
    Christian Science Monitor

    Points of Progress: Fiji reefs restored with traditional knowledge, and more

    In good news this week: Fijians used ancient fishery management systems to help reefs recover after overfishing, plus more positive headlines.

  • News
    Associated Press

    Video game pals admit to plot to firebomb Nebraska pharmacy

    William Burgamy, 32, of Hanover, Maryland, ran a website called NeverPressedRX that sold oxycodone and other drugs over the darknet, a part of the Internet only accessible through encryption, prosecutors in U.S. District Court in Alexandria said. According to court papers, the two conspired to blow up a competing pharmacy in Wilson’s town, Cody’s U-Save Pharmacy. The two reasoned that Wilson’s pharmacy would pick up more business and allow him to illegally funnel even more drugs to the darknet operation without attracting the suspicion of federal regulators.

  • Amazon tells workers to take TikTok app off phones: report
    Business
    AFP

    Amazon tells workers to take TikTok app off phones: report

    Amazon workers were given a Friday deadline to dump the TikTok mobile application because of unspecified security concerns, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

  • Deadline of 2025 to be set on culling Huawei kit
    News
    The Telegraph

    Deadline of 2025 to be set on culling Huawei kit

    The Culture Secretary is poised to announce a 2025 deadline to strip Huawei from the UK’s 5G network. On Tuesday, Oliver Dowden will make a statement in the House of Commons where he will discuss the future of the Chinese giant in Britain’s telecoms infrastructure. Ministers have indicated that they want Huawei’s hardware removed from the network within five years. Tory MPs have pressed Boris Johnson to speed up the process to 2023. However, BT and Vodafone warned of widespread mobile phone blackouts unless they were given at least five years to strip out Huawei kit. Andrea Dona, Vodafone UK head of network, urged that any further restrictions “look at a sensible and practically feasible timescale over several years”, while she cautioned that it would cost “single figure billions” of pounds to remove the equipment. The original deadline for removing Huawei was 2029 but Tory rebels threatened to defeat the Government in the Commons by voting against legislation setting out the timetable. They indicated they would be prepared to compromise a date that would mean the work would be mostly completed by the time of the next election. Sir Iain Duncan Smith, former Conservative leader and one of the 60-strong group of Tory backbench MPs demanding a complete ban on Huawei in UK infrastructure, told this newspaper a “material change” would be needed. “It’s going to take them a while to get it out,” he said, “but 2029 won’t be acceptable. It may be 2025 but they will have to come forward with a timescale otherwise the Bill will be rejected.”