• Sinclair hopes old will become new again at theater

    Associated Press - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    In the lobby of the old movie theater, it's drafty. The plaster is peeling. There is a tricycle, a kiddie kitchen and other items stored by the town's recreation center. But take a few steps further into ... More »Sinclair hopes old will become new again at theater

  • Oil leaps 5 percent, most in a month, on air strikes in Yemen

    Reuters - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    By Barani Krishnan NEW YORK (Reuters) - Oil jumped about 5 percent on Thursday, the biggest daily gain in a month, as air strikes in Yemen by Saudi Arabia and its Gulf Arab allies sparked fears that escalation of the Middle East battle could disrupt world crude supplies. The Saudi military operation against the Iran-backed Houthi rebels, who have driven Yemen's president from the capital Sanaa, has not affected oil facilities of major Gulf producers. Some analysts said the chance of an all-out proxy war between the Saudis and Iran looked remote. "You don't want to be short oil when there are stories about bombings next door to Saudi Arabia, even if it's the Saudis who are leading the charge," said Joseph Posillico, senior vice president of energy futures at Jefferies in New York. More »Oil leaps 5 percent, most in a month, on air strikes in Yemen

  • Russian, American ready for a year in space

    Associated Press - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan (AP) — The Russian astronaut heading off for a year in space says he'll miss the natural landscapes on Earth. His American counterpart jokes he won't miss his twin brother. More »Russian, American ready for a year in space

  • Saudi strikes Yemen rebels as Iran warns of 'dangerous step'

    AFP - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Warplanes from a Saudi-led coalition bombed Huthi Shiite rebels Thursday in support of Yemen's embattled president, who headed to an Arab summit to garner support as Iran warned the intervention was "dangerous". More »Saudi strikes Yemen rebels as Iran warns of 'dangerous step'

  • Russia heads to 'America's backyard' to find salve for sanctions

    Christian Science Monitor - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Russia took its global charm offensive to Latin America this week, as the Kremlin seeks to counter Western sanctions over its policies in eastern Ukraine and Crimea. Over the past few days, Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov reassured Cuba of ongoing support, denounced US sanctions against Venezuela, and even suggested Russia might be willing to take part in building a Nicaraguan rival to the Panama Canal. More »Russia heads to 'America's backyard' to find salve for sanctions

  • U.N. says Libyan parties need more time to agree unity government

    Reuters - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Libya's warring factions need more time to agree on a unity government to end growing conflict and chaos in the oil producer, a U.N. envoy said on Thursday. Two rival governments and armed factions are battling for control of Libya and Islamist militants are gaining ground. Last week, the U.N. Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL), mediating at peace talks in Morocco, said a preliminary deal could be reached in a few days. "I was very realistic, and I said we were making progress," U.N. special envoy to Libya Bernadino Leon told reporters in Morocco. More »U.N. says Libyan parties need more time to agree unity government

  • Displacement doubles in north Cameroon in flight from Boko Haram

    Reuters - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    By Misha Hussain and Emmanuel Musa Tansa DAKAR/YAOUNDE (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The number of people in northern Cameroon who have fled their homes fearing the violence in neighbouring Nigeria and cross-border raids by Islamist sect Boko Haram doubled in March to 117,000, a United Nations survey showed. Boko Haram, which wants to carve out an Islamic caliphate in northern Nigeria, recently expanded its activities into Niger and Cameroon for the first time since launching its insurgency in 2009. It has killed 6,400 people in 337 incidents since January 2014, the United Nations has said. There are some 117,000 displaced people in northern Cameroon, U.N. Sahel coordinator Robert Piper said, almost double the 60,000 recorded a month ago, adding to the strain on scarce resources in an area still recovering from a decade of periodic drought. More »Displacement doubles in north Cameroon in flight from Boko Haram

  • Ebola 'Supervirus' Is Unlikely, Experts Say

    LiveScience.com - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    The Ebola virus that is causing the current outbreak in West Africa is not mutating as quickly as earlier reports had suggested, a new study finds. In the study, published online today (March 26) in the journal Science, researchers compared virus samples from people in Africa who became infected with Ebola up to nine months apart. "We do not see any evidence that the virus is mutating any more rapidly than has been reported in previous outbreaks," said Thomas Hoenen, a postdoctoral fellow in virology at the National Institutes of Health and one of the researchers on the study. In a 2014 study published in the journal Science, researchers had suggested that the Ebola virus in the West African epidemic was mutating twice as fast as other Ebola virus strains. More »Ebola 'Supervirus' Is Unlikely, Experts Say

  • Richard III Gets a Regal Tomb 530 Years After His Death

    LiveScience.com - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    One of history's most infamous kings, Richard III, was reburied today (March 26) in a lavish ceremony in Leicester, England, 530 years after his violent death in battle. Capping a week of events and processions celebrating the medieval monarch, Richard's stark oak casket was lowered into a brick-lined vault near the altar at Leicester Cathedral in front of hundreds of people today. In 2012, archaeologists seeking Richard's lost grave amazingly found the king's battle-scarred bones under a parking lot in Leicester. When Richard's skeleton was discovered in the ruins of Grey Friars, it provided scientists a rare opportunity to intimately examine the body of a historical figure. More »Richard III Gets a Regal Tomb 530 Years After His Death

  • Moon's Iron Core May Reveal Solar System Secrets with X-Ray Scan

    SPACE.com - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Deep beneath the surface of the moon lies an iron heart that scientists are probing in a new study: By using X-rays to scan the kind of iron probably found in the moon's core, scientists may gain better estimates of the core's size and composition. Rocky planets and moons generally have metallic cores made up mostly of iron. A better understanding of the properties of iron at the high pressures and temperatures often found in the cores of these rocky bodies could yield vital insights about the solar system. For example, precise knowledge of the structure and composition of the moon's core is essential for understanding its origin and evolution, which, in turn, would shed light on the birth and development of Earth. More »Moon's Iron Core May Reveal Solar System Secrets with X-Ray Scan

  • Glowing Cloud of Rocket Fuel Captured in Night Sky Photo

    SPACE.com - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    A mysterious cloud that glowed in the night sky above the Atlantic Ocean on the night of March 12 was actually a spray of unused rocket fuel, released following a launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Keen-eyed skywatcher Scott Gauer sent us this photograph of the glowing fuel cloud — which appears as a small fan of light in the sky — from Danville, Pennsylvania. The fuel came from an Atlas V rocket launched by NASA and carrying four satellites that make up the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission, or MMS, a science experiment that will study energetic events in Earth's magnetic field. More »Glowing Cloud of Rocket Fuel Captured in Night Sky Photo

  • Dark Matter Probably Isn't a Mirror Universe, Colliding Galaxies Suggest

    SPACE.com - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Dark matter may not be part of a "dark sector" of particles that mirrors regular matter, as some theories suggest, say scientists studying collisions of galaxy clusters. When clusters of galaxies collide, the hot gas that fills the space between the stars in those galaxies also collides and splatters in all directions with a motion akin to splashes of water. Dark matter makes up about 90 percent of the matter in galaxy clusters: Does it splatter like water as well? New research suggests that no, dark matter does not splatter when clusters of galaxies collide, and this finding limits the kinds of particles that can make up dark matter. More »Dark Matter Probably Isn't a Mirror Universe, Colliding Galaxies Suggest

  • Air Force official touts Eielson assets at scoping meeting

    Associated Press - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Eielson Air Force Base has "phenomenal assets" that make it attractive for basing new F-35 fighter jets, an Air Force official said Wednesday at a public scoping meeting. "One of the reasons ... More »Air Force official touts Eielson assets at scoping meeting

  • Antarctic ice shelf loss 'quicker'

    Press Association - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Floating ice shelves fringing Antarctica have thinned by almost a fifth in some areas over nearly two decades, research shows. More »Antarctic ice shelf loss 'quicker'

  • FDA to scrutinize unproven alternative remedies

    Associated Press - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal officials plan to review the safety and evidence behind alternative remedies like Zicam and Cold-Eeze, products that are protected by federal law, but not accepted by mainstream medicine. More »FDA to scrutinize unproven alternative remedies

  • Bat study reveals 'airway code'

    Press Association - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Bats obey an "airway code" to avoid collisions as they dive and turn at high speed while chasing food, scientists have discovered. More »Bat study reveals 'airway code'

  • When HIV Infects the Brain

    The Atlantic - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Just over 30 years ago, an international group of scientists discovered the HIV virus. While much progress has been made since the early days of the epidemic (in terms of awareness, prevention, and treatment), HIV and AIDS remain a leading cause of death worldwide, and rank as the number one cause of death both in Africa and among women of reproductive age. A study published Thursday in the online journal PLOS Pathogens gives reason for pause, showing that HIV can behave more insidiously than previously seen. In turn, HIV in the brain can genetically mutate—differentiating itself from the type circulating in the blood—which means that certain drugs used to treat the virus may not work as well in the central nervous system as they do in other parts of the body. More »When HIV Infects the Brain

  • Lack of electricity undermines Nigerian president's relection bid

    Reuters - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    By Julia Payne ABUJA (Reuters) - Nigerian president Goodluck Jonathan's election campaign has trumpeted his reform of the power sector as a crowning achievement. Jonathan took the bold step in 2013 of selling parts of the moribund state electricity firm and says the privatisation has bourne fruit. More »Lack of electricity undermines Nigerian president's relection bid

  • Report: Diversity of New England plant life is threatened

    Associated Press - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    BOSTON (AP) — From picturesque coastal estuaries of Cape Cod to the soaring White Mountains, much of New England's rich native flora is fighting for survival against increasing odds, according to what conservationists call the most comprehensive accounting ever made of the region's plant life. More »Report: Diversity of New England plant life is threatened

  • Raspberry Pi competition: Robot dog unlocks potential of pocket-sized computer

    IB Times - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Since launching in 2012 the Raspberry Pi has fundamentally changed the way computer science is taught. More than five million of the credit card-sized computers have been used by schools around the world to teach the principles of computer hardware and circuitry, while encouraging students to build their own electronics. At the third annual PA Raspberry Pi Competition, held this week at London's Science Museum, the full potential of the device was put to the test by teams of students challenged to create something that could "make the world a better place". I had that when I was little with Spectrums and Omegas – it's very hard with modern computers, so having something like the Raspberry Pi that's really easy to use and they can see stuff happen. More »Raspberry Pi competition: Robot dog unlocks potential of pocket-sized computer

  • Seven die in Chile floods, military rescues stranded residents

    Reuters - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    The death toll in Chile rose to seven after rains battered the north and caused flooding, the government said on Thursday, while 19 others were unaccounted for as the military rushed to rescue stranded villagers. Rivers have burst their banks, flooding towns, making roads impassable and forcing miners in Chile, the world's top copper exporter, to suspend operations. Chile, a sliver of land between the Pacific Ocean and the Andes Mountains in one of the world's most seismic zones, is used to dealing with natural disasters. Military helicopters flew in supplies and evacuated residents from three villages in the Atacama region that were entirely cut off and only reachable by air, Mahmud Aleuy, the deputy interior minister, said on Thursday. More »Seven die in Chile floods, military rescues stranded residents

  • FTSE falls for third day as tech, travel stocks are hit

    Reuters - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    By Alistair Smout and Francesco Canepa LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's top share index fell sharply on Thursday, led by tech stocks as investors grew nervous about their declining growth prospects and rich valuations. Britain's FTSE 100 closed 1.4 percent lower at 6,895.33 points, bringing the drop since a record high hit on Tuesday to 2.4 percent. Analysts at Citigroup on Thursday cut their forecasts for the smartphone sector and target prices on stocks highly exposed to China, the world's largest phone market, including Britain's ARM, which designs computer and smartphone chips. ... More »FTSE falls for third day as tech, travel stocks are hit

  • Exclusive: Chemical arms body to investigate allegations of Syrian chlorine gas attack - source

    Reuters - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    By Anthony Deutsch THE HAGUE (Reuters) - The global chemical weapons watchdog will investigate allegations of a chlorine gas attack on a Syrian village that killed six and wounded dozens earlier this month, a source told Reuters on Thursday. The source at the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), who spoke on condition of anonymity, said a fact-finding mission will examine reports that barrel bombs were dropped on Sarmin village in Idlib province. The OPCW launched the fact-finding mission nearly a year ago to investigate claims of chlorine gas attacks and it has found that chlorine gas use is "systematic" in Syria's four year civil war. The attack on Sarmin came 10 days after the United Nations Security Council condemned the use of chlorine as a weapon in Syria and threatened to take action if such arms are used again in the conflict. More »Exclusive: Chemical arms body to investigate allegations of Syrian chlorine gas attack - source

  • Are Smart Pills & Brain Zapping Risky? Bioethicists Weigh In

    LiveScience.com - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Now, bioethicists are weighing in, saying that while such cognitive enhancement is neither bad nor good, it deserves more research. In the past, "there have been many arguments that suggest one should take an ethical stance for or against cognitive enhancement" of healthy individuals, said Amy Gutmann, chairwoman of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, which released the second part of a report today (March 26) on ethics in neuroscience research, commissioned by President Barack Obama as part of the BRAIN Initiative, a collaborative effort to develop tools to study the human brain. "We as a commission recommend there is no bright line to be drawn here," Gutmann told Live Science during a news conference yesterday. The new report focused on three main areas: cognitive enhancement, informed consent in mentally impaired individuals and the use of neuroscience in the legal system. More »Are Smart Pills & Brain Zapping Risky? Bioethicists Weigh In

  • Turkey's Erdogan says Iran and 'terrorist groups' must leave Yemen - France 24

    Reuters - Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    President Tayyip Erdogan was quoted on Thursday as saying Turkey may consider providing logisitical support to the Saudi-led military mission in Yemen and called on Iran and "terrorist groups" to withdraw from the country. "Turkey may consider providing logistical support based on the evolution of the situation," Erdogan told France 24 in an interview, extracts of which were published on its website and by Turkish broadcasters. "Iran and the terrorist groups must withdraw," he said. More »Turkey's Erdogan says Iran and 'terrorist groups' must leave Yemen - France 24

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