Scotland set to come to standstill as country says final goodbye to Queen

·2-min read
The Royal Guards stand as members of the public view the Queen’s coffin lying in state in Westminster Hall (Chip Somodevilla/PA) (PA Wire)
The Royal Guards stand as members of the public view the Queen’s coffin lying in state in Westminster Hall (Chip Somodevilla/PA) (PA Wire)

Scotland is set to come to a standstill on Monday as the country says its final goodbye to the Queen.

The funeral of Elizabeth II was taking place at Westminster Abbey in London, with the day declared a UK bank holiday by King Charles III.

Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon will attend the Queen’s funeral in the UK capital.

The Scottish Government has confirmed that all schools across Scotland will be closed as a mark of respect.

Colleges and universities will also shut their doors, while most local authority nurseries will be closed.

Mourners will be able to come together to watch the state funeral at Holyrood Park, in Edinburgh, on the doorstep of the royal Palace of Holyroodhouse residence.

Shops, including retail outlets, and visitor attractions such as museums and libraries will not open for the bank holiday.

Some health services will be impacted, but NHS Scotland said previously that measures were being put in place to enable “vital” healthcare to continue.

GP surgeries have been able to decide whether or not to close.

According to the Scottish Government: “Health boards have been given guidance to support their planning for the holiday which underlines the importance of essential healthcare services continuing.

“This includes pre-planned treatments, and the winter vaccination programme. Patients should visit their local NHS board website for further information.”

Public transport is expected to operate as normal.

The monarch died at her Balmoral estate in Aberdeenshire on August 8 and thousands of Scots have paid their respects to the Queen during the period of national mourning.

Her coffin travelled to the Palace of Holyroodhouse, before her son Charles led the procession up the city’s Royal Mile to St Giles’ Cathedral last Monday.

Well-wishers left floral tributes and lined the streets of Edinburgh to pay their final respects.