Junk food backpack craze: Schoolchildren replacing packed lunches with 'calorie bombs'

Rishma Dosani
This image shows a snapshot of the junk food that children are chomping on daily. (CEN)
This image shows a snapshot of the junk food that children are chomping on daily. (CEN)

Nutritional experts in South Korea have voiced concerns over a new worrying trend - schoolchildren replacing traditional rucksacks and packed lunches with junk food backpacks.

Food nutrition expert Nobuto Yajima is among those who say that the sweet-filled rucksacks toted by youngsters will lead to an explosion in obesity cases.

It has become normal for parents to give children highly calorific home-made snacks as gifts, but these are rapidly replacing the rice, noodles and salads that children traditionally take to school for lunch.

Yajima added: 'Nutella and cheese sandwiches, chocolate eggs, and cream-filled pastries - these are not the building blocks of a healthy nation.

'What started as a novelty is rapidly becoming a way of life. Koreans risk becoming a nation of waddling, Sumo-sized fatties if this continues unchecked.

'Some of these backpacks contain 10,000 calories - and children are eating them all in one day. Something must be done to stem this tide.'

Often snack backpacks are simply bundles of sweet and savoury items and with straps also forged from food attached end to end to make it easy to carry, and some are well-engineered fully functional backpacks with even more snacks inside.

'This is especially great because you can start eating your gift right away without ruining the integrity of the pack,' one schoolgirl explained on social media when telling the world about her bumper sweet filled backpack.

It has become normal for parents to give calorie bombs out to children as gifts (CEN)
It has become normal for parents to give calorie bombs out to children as gifts (CEN)
Backpacks made from fatty snacks (CEN)
Backpacks made from fatty snacks (CEN)