Stephen Hawking once threw a champagne party for time travelers. Sadly no one showed up.

Lissa Cosgrove
Video Producer, Yahoo Entertainment

Stephen Hawking knew how to throw a good party, whether people attended or not.

The physicist, who died early Wednesday, was determined to solve the question of time travel in his 2010 Discovery Channel documentary, Into the Universe. So he set up a “simple experiment” to uncover whether human time travel through a wormhole is possible now… or in the future.

“I like simple experiments — and champagne. So I’ve combined two of my favorite things to see if time travel from the future to the past is possible,” Hawking says in the documentary. “I’m throwing a party. A welcome reception for future time travelers.” But of course, there was a twist. Hawking didn’t release his invitations until after the party had happened.

Hawking’s invitations included the exact coordinates and time of the event but, naturally, he did not require an RSVP with hopes that the invitation would last for many thousands of years.

The champagne was bubbling, and the small plates were set. All he had to do was sit and wait for a visitor from the future, but sadly, no one showed up. “What a shame,” the physicist said. He probably knew, like with any experiment, there was a chance of being disappointed, but that didn’t stop him from cracking a joke. “I was hoping a future Ms. Universe was going to step through the door.”

But even though Hawking has passed, it’s possible that his time traveler party will be a belated success. A very, very belated success.

”Maybe one day someone living in the future will find the information and will use the wormhole time machine to come back to my party, proving that time travel will one day be possible,” Hawking said.

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