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Storm Fergus to sweep UK prompting road, rail, air and ferry transport fears

Storm Fergus is expected to bring further bad weather <i>(Image: Getty)</i>
Storm Fergus is expected to bring further bad weather (Image: Getty)

The UK is expected to be hit by further bad weather as transport cancellations are looking ever more likely due to Storm Fergus safety fears.

Storm Fergus was named by the Irish meteorological service, Met Eireann.

Trains, flights, ferries and car journeys could be disrupted by the bad weather, while seafronts and coastal communities may be affected by spray and large waves.

Met Office meteorologist Simon Partridge said conditions will hopefully turn drier and more settled in the second half of next week.

On Saturday, Storm Elin brought strong winds and heavy downpours to parts of the UK and Ireland.

Manchester was particularly affected, with train services from Piccadilly cancelled after an overhead line "exploded".

Northern Rail issued a "do not travel" alert to passengers, citing "multiple weather-related incidents".

Trains travelling to Liverpool, Wales, Norwich, York and Edinburgh were all affected.

Some passengers were left stranded, with many being forced to hire expensive taxis or get hotel rooms.

Cancelled flights

Hovercraft passengers to and from the Isle of Wight are being warned cancellations to its cross-Solent flights are expected from 12 noon today (Sunday) due to the adverse weather forecast.

This morning, Hovertravel is currently running its flights between Ryde Esplanade and Southsea to the timetable.

However, in a message posted on its website, it says: "weather cancellations expected from 12pm. Please see our disruption contingency plan."

Met Office update

"After a brief lull once morning rain clears from west to east across the area, further heavy rain or showers will develop Sunday evening, before clearing during the early hours of Monday.

"Many parts will see 15-20 mm, with the wettest spots seeing 30-40 mm. Given very wet ground, some impacts are likely."