Study: The average American drops their mobile phone at least four times a week

Hold onto your phones -- according to new research, one in three Americans currently have a crack in their phone's screen.

The constant threat of dropping our phones and cracking the screen - or worse - is leaving many of us with a bit of "Phone-xiety."

A new study of 2,000 Americans found that over half of those surveyed (52 percent) admit they are "always" worried about the safety of their phone.

In fact, the average American has six "heart attack moments" every week where they start to drop their phone but save it just in time.

The survey, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of PhoneLoops.com, found that it's apparently very difficult for Americans to get a grip these days - at least on their phones.

According to the poll, the average American polled drops their phone on the ground four times every week, and over a third of Americans say they actually drop it even more than that.

Some Americans are making other technologies - often pricey themselves - do double-duty as protective measures.

Headphones have come to the rescue for half of those surveyed more than once, as 46 percent say they've been able to save their phone from hitting the ground by grabbing onto the headphone cable for dear life.

While dropping your phone only once CAN leave it unscathed and functional, nearly two in three Americans (61 percent) say they've cracked their phone's screen or worse the very first time they ever dropped it.

One in three unlucky Americans (33 percent) have even dropped their phone straight into the toilet.

"Gravity seems to be a constant challenge when it comes to our smartphones," said JP Brousseau, CEO, PhoneLoops.com. "Getting a protective phone case is the first step, but even that can't always prevent damage to your phone if you drop it. A strap offers the simplest way to keep your grip, even one-handed - and that's what Phone Loops provide."

These risks are no small matter - Americans rely on their phones so much that 76 percent say they'd be completely lost if their phone suddenly stopped working.

Many Americans reinforced this sentiment in what they're willing to do to protect their phones: half of those surveyed say they'd sacrifice their own body if it meant their phone would be free from harm.

Taking it even further, the average American polled says they'd happily shell out upwards of $475 if it meant they'd never drop their phone again.

"No one should have to cause themselves bodily harm to save their smartphone - or spend nearly $500 - when they could spend $6 on a comfortable, seamless and stylish solution," Brousseau said. "Phone Loops represent that small investment people can make to protect the big investment they make in their phones, which touch every aspect of our lives today."