Study finds what sleeping naked may reveal about you

If you call yourself a night owl - you may prefer to sleep naked, according to new research.  

A new study of 2,000 Americans examined their sleeping habits and personalities in relation to whether they prefer to sleep in the buff or wear pajamas (1,000 respondents in each preference).  

Nude sleepers were more likely to call themselves night owls (38%), whereas pajama-wearers, identified as a mixture between an early bird and night owl - at 34%.  

And it turns out, self-confidence may not be that closely related to your choice of sleep attire.  

Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Mattress Advisor, the survey found pajama-wearers ranked their self-confidence as a six out 10 in comparison to only a five out of 10 from those who sleep in the buff.  

This could also relate to sleeping nudists identifying as introverts (45%) and pajama-wearers calling themselves ambiverts (47%).  

No matter their choice of sleepwear, however, all respondents listed their top reasons behind their choices as comfortability, temperature issues (being either too hot or too cold when sleeping) and relaxation.   

Twenty-six percent of pajama-wearers said they prefer to be clothed so they don't have to wash their sheets as frequently.  

Although 36% of those who sleep nude said it's healthier to sleep naked, the fear of accidentally being seen in their birthday suit was a concern of 24% of pajama-wearers.  

Both parties, however, seem to keep one particular unhealthy habit - reporting to only wash their sheets an average of three times a month.  

"The general rule of thumb is to wash your sheets at least once a week," says Alesandra Woolley, executive editor and certified sleep science coach at Mattress Advisor. "The average person produces 26 gallons of sweat in bed each year - that's about nine fluid ounces each night. To continue sleeping on the same sheets night after night not only poses health risks with bacteria build-up, but can also impact the quality of sleep you're getting."   

When it comes to relationships, however, clothing choice appears to have quite an impact.  

Three in 10 of all respondents said they felt pressure to look attractive when hitting the hay with their significant other in the early stages of their relationship.  

Fifty-four percent of pajama-wearers even said they changed their sleeping attire altogether to impress their significant other.  

In fact, despite wearing pajamas or not, respondents said it took an average of three months to feel their most comfortable about their clothing choice when going to sleep with their partner.  

Sleeping nude does seem to improve your sex life, however, at an average of five times a week compared to four times a week for those who wear pajamas.  

At the end of the day, however, both parties agreed tossing their pajamas increases intimacy between partners - at 71 percent.  

"Whether you sleep in luxury silk pajamas or nothing at all, it's most important to feel comfortable when you're sleeping," says Woolley. "Your sleep environment, including what you wear to bed, can have a significant impact on your quality of sleep. So be sure not to sacrifice comfort for style when winding down for the night."

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