Sturgeon tells Truss independence is a decision for Scots voters, not the new PM

·2-min read
Nicola Sturgeon (Russell Cheyne/PA)
Nicola Sturgeon (Russell Cheyne/PA)

Nicola Sturgeon has told Liz Truss that Scotland’s future in the UK will be “decided by the people of Scotland” and not by the new prime minister.

The Scottish First Minister said that was a “democratic principle”.

Ms Truss, who won the race to become the next Conservative leader and UK Prime Minister, is opposed to the Scottish Government’s plans to hold a second independence referendum next year.

But speaking in the wake of Ms Truss’ victory over Rishi Sunak, the Scottish First Minister said the matter should not be decided by a prime minister that Scotland “wouldn’t have voted for”.

One thing is clear, and it's a democratic principle here, the future of Scotland will be decided by the people of Scotland

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon

Ms Sturgeon said: “Scottish democracy is not the property of a UK prime minister. And nor is it the property of a UK prime minister that Scotland doesn’t and wouldn’t have voted for it.”

With the First Minister having outlined plans for a second independence referendum on October 19 2023, she said Scottish ministers were currently focused on the outcome of a Supreme Court hearing next month – where judges will consider if a vote can be held without the consent of the UK Government.

The SNP leader said: “We’re obviously, at the moment, looking ahead to the Supreme Court hearing which will look at the ability of the Scottish Parliament to legislate for a referendum without the consent of the UK Government.

“So we will see what the outcome of that is.

“But one thing is clear, and it’s a democratic principle here, the future of Scotland will be decided by the people of Scotland. It will not be decided by Liz Truss, any more than it would have been decided by Boris Johnson before her.

“It’s for Scotland to decide whether it wants to be independent or not.”

Ms Sturgeon has previously made clear that if she cannot hold another independence vote, she will seek to use the next Westminster general election as a “de facto referendum” on the issue.