Superdrug warns hayfever sufferers as it 'pulls products from shelves'

Superdrug has warned hay fever sufferers as it pulls products from shelves over "microbiological issues". The high street giant, which has branches across Birmingham, has withdrawn two types of eye mist have been pulled from shelves following the potential manufacturing error.

Superdrug warned: "Superdrug Irritated Eye Mist 10ml is being recalled. Sku Code: 820454 with the following batch numbers: BC: EM233782, EXP: 31/01/2026, BC: EM233788, EXP: 31/01/2026, BC: EM233851, EXP: 28/02/2026 and BC: EM233915, EXP: 30/04/2026.

"Customer safety is of utmost importance to Superdrug. We have been advised of a potential contamination issue with the above batches of this product. Customers who have bought the affected product are advised to stop using this product. Instead return it to a Superdrug store for a full refund.

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"No other Superdrug products have been affected. The safety of customers is our top priority and we are very sorry for any inconvenience caused." Superdrug Allergy Eye Mist 10ml is being recalled, too, with Sku Code: 803182 with the following batch numbers: BC: EM233920, EXP: 30/04/2026, BC: EM233824, EXP: 28/02/2026, BC: EM233926, EXP: 30/04/2026 and BC: EM233941, EXP: 30/04/2026.

Hay fever is a common allergy that causes sneezing, coughing and itchy eyes. You cannot cure it, but there are things you can do to help your symptoms, or medicines you can take to help, the NHS says. Symptoms of hay fever include sneezing and coughing, a runny or blocked nose and itchy, red or watery eyes.

Other signs and symptoms can be itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears, loss of smell, pain around the sides of your head and your forehead, headache and feeling tired. Symptoms are usually worse between late March and September, especially when it's warm, humid and windy. This is when the pollen count is at its highest.

Hay fever can last for weeks or months, unlike a cold, which usually goes away after 1 to 2 weeks.