Teachers: We will strike if we don't get 'inflation-plus' pay rise

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Teachers threaten strike if they don't get 'inflation-plus' pay rise
Teachers threaten strike if they don't get 'inflation-plus' pay rise

Teachers will ballot to go on strike if they are not given an "inflation-plus pay increase", the general-secretary of the National Education Union (NEU) has threatened.

In a letter to Nadhim Zahawi, the education secretary, Dr Mary Bousted has said that government "inaction" is causing "real damage to education" as well as to the livelihoods of teachers.

"You must respond to the new economic reality of double-digit inflation and the threat this poses to teacher living standards," her open letter reads.

"We call on you to commit to an inflation-plus increase for all teachers.  It is not good enough to only propose higher increases for beginner teachers (which are themselves likely to be lower than inflation)."

If the demands for a significant pay increase are not met, the NEU say they will consult members on taking strike action at the start of the new school year.

"We have to tell you that failing sufficient action by you, in the Autumn Term, we will consult our members on their willingness to take industrial action.

"And we will be strongly encouraging them to vote yes.  We can no longer stand by while you run both education and educators into the ground."

Inflation reaches 9.1 per cent

The demands come as the latest figures released this morning by the ONS shows inflation has reached a 40-year high of 9.1 per cent.

On Monday, Dr Bousted told the BBC that the NEU would set out plans for industrial action in the letter to Mr Zahawi, highlighting NEU research that claimed to show her members have suffered a real world drop in wages of 20 per cent since 2010.

"They have some time to get into negotiations with us and to see what they can do to avert any strike, which is the last thing our members want to do," she told the Today programme.

"This is a cry for help."

Teachers are the latest group of workers to threaten industrial action, after rail workers went on strike this week, grinding the country's transport network to a halt.

Commuters will continue to face travel misery all week, with further walk outs planned for Thursday and Saturday.

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