If Your Teeth Have Been Feeling Weird Lately, You Can Blame The Weather

Have your teeth been feeling a little...odd since winter appeared? (Photo: sorbetto via Getty Images)
Have your teeth been feeling a little...odd since winter appeared? (Photo: sorbetto via Getty Images)

Have your teeth been feeling a little...odd since winter appeared? (Photo: sorbetto via Getty Images)

As Jon Snow once famously said, ‘winter is coming’, and for many of us that spells sniffles, colds and bugs.

However, dentists also want you to be aware of what this month’s sudden drop in temperature means for your pearly whites.

Yup, just like your skin and hair, your teeth also take a hit as winter draws in.

Dr. Khaled Kasem, chief orthodontist at the chainImpress, has shared the most common effects of cold weather on your teeth, and what you can do to help.

If your teeth have been feeling a bit more sensitive lately, it’s likely because of the mercury plunging.

“Tooth sensitivity in the cold months is common - as you begin to breathe in cold air, your tooth enamel will expand and contract at different rates,” explains Dr Kasem.

“This can cause cracks or cavities that exposes dentine (the layer beneath the enamel which covers outside of the teeth). As this happens, the nerves become irritated, causing you to feel sudden sharp jolts of pain and sensitivity.”

Fortunately there are ways to keep this phenomenon at bay.

“If it’s particularly cold outside, breathe through your nose where you can, as this will minimise how much of the cold air hits your teeth,” Dr Kasem advises.

“It’s also always best to stick to room temperature drinks rather than reaching for a burning hot beverage or an ice cold refreshment, as this will prevent any sudden temperature changes on your teeth. If your teeth regularly feel sensitive, make sure you switch to a sensitive toothpaste, and avoid brushing too hard.”

This article originally appeared on HuffPost UK and has been updated.

Related...