Theresa May gives campaign speech in place so remote, TV crews could not find reception

Tareq Haddad
theresa-may-gives-campaign-speech-in-aberdeenshire

Prime Minister Theresa May has held a campaign rally in a Scottish village so remote that TV crews could not broadcast the speech live because of the lack of reception.

The Conservative Party leader has faced continued criticism for not taking parts in televised debates and now faces fresh accusations of trying to hide from public view.

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She had travelled to Scotland to convince voters that supporting the Tories would "strengthen the Union", the economy and her hand in Brexit talks, but held the talk in a village so small it only comprises of 50 houses.

The campaign event was held in Crathes Village Hall in Aberdeenshire. When IBTimes UK contacted staff at the establishment, they said the area was so sparsely populated no one knew how many people lived there.

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May delivered the speech shortly after Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn delivered his address in London, which was broadcast on Facebook Live and has since been shared over 3,800 times and watched by over 165,000 people.

On Twitter, Labour's Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell accused May of "hiding in a forest".

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"Been out all day on the campaign trail in Mansfield," he said. "Can someone please explain to me why our Prime Minister is hiding in a forest?"

May's visit to Scotland comes a day after a similar trip to Harehills in Leeds where she was again accused of hiding from voters.

Her refusal to take part in TV debates was justified because she said she believes in campaigns where politicians "actually get out and about and meet the voters", but the Guardian reported that the rally was comprised only of Conservative Party activists.

Rik Kendell, a worker in the Shine centre where May's event was held, told the newspaper: "There were no locals in the building other than some Shine staff and an invited congregation of well-dressed Tories.

"Harehills as a community was not represented or addressed."

He added: "As one of the poorer and more diverse areas in Leeds, I'm sure the residents of Harehills would have appreciated being involved.

"Instead Mrs May spoke exclusively to a hand-selected bunch of the party faithful."

Theresa May Scotland

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