Thousands of drivers take defiant action and refuse to follow incoming 'ban'

Electric cars are being deemed "too expensive" with drivers opting for used petrol and diesel vehicles instead. Upfront costs of electric vehicles, or EVs, are still well above the £10,000 price mark, resulting in motorists choosing to stick with the cheaper petrol or diesel option.

Richard Walker, data and insight director at Auto Trader, explained that the market is being boosted by economic “green shoots”,with consumer confidence rising in the wake of falling inflation and anticipation of further tax cuts on household budgets.

He said: “We need to make more progress on affordability to encourage retail demand, especially as exemptions from both Vehicle Excise Duty and the expensive car supplement end for EVs next year.” Philip Nothard, insight director at Cox Automotive, said: “Double-digit growth in the first three months is no mean feat and cannot be easily dismissed.

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“But the market is a long way off what could reasonably be characterised as ‘normal’.” Philip Nothard, insight director at Cox Automotive, said: “Double-digit growth in the first three months is no mean feat and cannot be easily dismissed.

“But the market is a long way off what could reasonably be characterised as ‘normal’.” Auto Trader said just 10,000 of the used electric options on its UK-wide online vehicle marketplace cost under £15,000. That is compared with 350,000 used petrol or diesel cars in the same price bracket, it also found.

Under the ZEV mandate, at least 22 per cent of new cars and 10 per cent of new vans sold by each manufacturer in the UK in 2024 is required to be zero emission, which in most cases means pure electric. The threshold will rise annually until it reaches 100 per cent by 2035, when the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans will be banned in the UK.