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'Barbaric' thug attacked pregnant woman and eight police officers in York

Ex-soldier Dylan Turpin (left) and the Brigadier Gerard pub in Monkgate, York <i>(Image: North Yorkshire Police and Newsquest)</i>
Ex-soldier Dylan Turpin (left) and the Brigadier Gerard pub in Monkgate, York (Image: North Yorkshire Police and Newsquest)

AN ex-soldier who hit 12 people including a pregnant landlady and several police officers in “barbaric” violence has been jailed.

Dylan Turpin began by twice biting the landlady’s father when the 23-year-old attacker was upstairs at the Brigadier Gerard pub in Monkgate and had been asked to leave, said Lauren Smith, prosecuting.

When the landlady, who was seven weeks pregnant, intervened he punched her in the stomach. Hospital checks later confirmed the unborn child was unharmed, York Crown Court heard.

Then Turpin put his arm round the neck of the landlady’s partner, bit his chest, and hit him, said Ms Smith. He also attacked the father's partner. Police were called and arrived shortly before midnight on November 4.

The Recorder of York, Judge Sean Morris told Turpin: “Three officers turned up, you took them on. Five officers turned up, you took them on.

“They were attacked in the house, they were attacked at the (police) van, they were attacked at the police station.

“You were spitting, you were biting, you were head butting, you didn’t care whether they were female officers or male officers. It went on and on.”

Earlier he had told Turpin: “You fall to be sentenced for behaving like a barbarian on that evening.” He also called the violence “barbaric”.

York Press: Dylan Turpin
York Press: Dylan Turpin

Dylan Turpin (Image: North Yorkshire Police)

Turpin, of North Moor Lane, Easingwold, pleaded guilty to one charge of causing actual bodily harm to the landlady’s father, one charge each of assaulting the landlady, her partner and her father's partner, eight of assaulting emergency workers who were police officers, one of assaulting an emergency worker who was a special constable, and two of criminal damage, one to a fire door at the pub and one to a police radio ear piece.

Judge Morris said: “Anyone spitting at police officers or biting them or head butting must expect an immediate custodial sentence because the courts must protect the police.”

He said he was sad to jail Turpin because he was normally a “decent young man” from a “decent" family.

Turpin was jailed for 12 months. He had never been to prison before, York Crown Court heard.

Five days after the violence, York Press reported how the Brigadier Gerard had closed unexpectedly with its car park blocked off. 

The pub's owners, Samuel Smith Brewery, declined to comment on the closure.

It was the second time this year the pub had closed.  In March, the York Press reported how it was looking for new management. 

York Press: The closed car park of the Brigadier Gerard this month
York Press: The closed car park of the Brigadier Gerard this month

The closed car park of the Brigadier Gerard this month (Image: Darren Greenwood)

Defence barrister Rhianydd Clement told York Crown Court Turpin was still recovering from the death of his 11-year-old brother from a brain tumour three years ago.

As well as being on anti-depressants and other medication for several mental health conditions, he drank to ease his pain.

On November 4, he had been drinking with the landlady's partner, who was his long-term friend.

He had said things that had made the friend so concerned he had invited Turpin to stay the night at the pub.

They had both been in the Army together when Turpin was a cook. He had joined when he was 16 and had left following his brother’s death, said Ms Clement.

Turpin was remorseful and apologised for his actions which had been out of character.

He provided caring and emotional support for family members of all ages, who would be affected if he was jailed, said Ms Clement.

In a personal statement, the landlady’s father said the two bite marks inflicted by Turpin on him had left permanent scars and affected him psychologically.