Top Qatari official puts worker deaths for World Cup ‘between 400 and 500’

© Kamran Jebreili, AP

A top Qatari official involved in the country's World Cup organization has put the number of worker deaths for the tournament “between 400 and 500” for the first time, a drastically higher number than any other previously offered by Doha.

The comment by Hassan al-Thawadi, the secretary-general of Qatar's Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, appeared to come off the cuff during an interview with British journalist Piers Morgan.

It also threatened to reinvigorate criticism by human rights groups over the toll of hosting the Middle East's first World Cup for the migrant labor that built over $200 billion worth of stadiums, metro lines and new infrastructure needed for the tournament.

In the interview, portions of which Morgan posted online, the British journalist asks al-Thawadi: "What is the honest, realistic total do you think of migrant workers who died from – as a result of work they’re doing for the World Cup in totality?”

“The estimate is around 400, between 400 and 500," al-Thawadi responds. "I don’t have the exact number. That’s something that’s been discussed.”

But that figure hasn't been discussed publicly by Qatari officials previously. Reports from the Supreme Committee dating from 2014 through the end of 2021 only include the number of deaths of workers involved in building and refurbishing the stadiums now hosting the World Cup.

“One death is a death too many. Plain and simple,” al-Thawadi adds in the interview.

(AP)


Read more on FRANCE 24 English

Read also:
‘Just hell’: New book shines light on migrant deaths ahead of Qatar World Cup
Nepalese workers in Qatar pay ultimate price for World Cup
Human rights in the Gulf states: Thousands of migrant worker deaths unexplained