TV presenter Sarah Cawood reveals she has been diagnosed with breast cancer

·2-min read
Sarah Cawood has opened up about being diagnosed with breast cancer  (Sarah Cawood/Instagram)
Sarah Cawood has opened up about being diagnosed with breast cancer (Sarah Cawood/Instagram)

TV presenter Sarah Cawood has opened up about being diagnosed with breast cancer and is feeling positive as she undergoes treatment.

The 50-year-old originally shot to fame in the 90s hosting shows such as Live & Kicking, Top of the Pops and The Girlie Show.

These days she is more focused on family and lives with her TV producer husband Andy Merry and their son and daughter Hunter, ten, and Autumn, nine, in Leigh-On-Sea, Essex,

She also hosts menopause podcast Irregular B*****s with friend Louise Mitchell.

Cawood was diagnosed with stage one breast cancer last month. Recalling how she discovered the news, she told The Sun : “It was my first ever routine mammogram and I got a letter back ­saying they couldn’t give me my screening result back yet.

Sarah Cawood originally shot to fame in the 1990s hosting TV shows including Top of the Pops (BBC)
Sarah Cawood originally shot to fame in the 1990s hosting TV shows including Top of the Pops (BBC)

“So I had another mammogram and an ultrasound and then they said, ‘We’re going to biopsy you’. That’s where they take a bit of tissue from your boob.”

She was later told that the lump ins her breast was not just a cyst and feared the worst, worrying that it could be an aggressive form.

She told the publication: “I did the lying in bed at night, not watching my children grow up thing. I always think cancer seems like a slow death. It’s like being chucked out of the party early.”

After going to get the results with her husband, she was relieved to find out that the cancer wasn’t an aggressive form and was treatable.

She explained: “Nobody cried, it wasn’t very dramatic. It’s just a lumpectomy, radio-therapy, then a drug called Tamoxifen, which is a hormone blocker, for five to ten years.”

Describing hers as the “Carlsberg of breast cancers,” in reference to the popular “if Carlsberg did” advertising campaigns of the early noughties, she says she is feeling “very lucky”.

One downside however is that following her diagnosis, Cawood has had to come off HRT, which she takes for the menopause, and has said that she is feeling the effect of it.

While she said that her mood appears to be OK, she finds her brain fog “annoying” and that she has forgotten her daughter’s name twice.