Twitter’s bird statue fetches $100,000 in auction after Elon Musk wants rid of ‘woke’ supplies

The Twitter bird logo reflected in a man’s eye. Elon Musk’s $44 billion takeover of the social media platform in October has coincided with a 40 per cent drop in revenue in the past year (PA Archive)
The Twitter bird logo reflected in a man’s eye. Elon Musk’s $44 billion takeover of the social media platform in October has coincided with a 40 per cent drop in revenue in the past year (PA Archive)

Twitter‘s bird statue has sold for a whopping $100,000 (£81,000) after Elon Musk’s mega-fire sale.

The statue was auctioned off alongside furniture, kitchen equipment and decorations at the company’s San Francisco headquarters.

The 27-hour auction ended late in the evening on Wednesday, January 18.

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Why was the Twitter bird statue sold?

Both Twitter and owner Elon Musk have stirred controversy over the past few months.

Mr Musk’s $44 billion (£36bn) takeover of the social media platform in October coincided with a 40 per cent drop in revenue in the past year. More than 500 advertisers have pulled out of the platform.

Mr Musk has laid off about half of the company’s 7,500 staff. He has also ended many of Twitter’s perks, such as free meals.

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Mr Musk subsequently stepped away from the CEO role and, due to severe cost cuts, decided to raise funds with an auction.

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He said this also allowed him to clear his San Francisco headquarters of “woke” supplies.

What else was sold at the auction?

The three-and-a-half-foot bird statue was the most expensive sale, despite a starting bid of only $25.

A neon light in the shape of Twitter’s bird logo fetched an impressive $40,000 (£32,400), Heritage Global Partners auction service confirmed.

The auction didn’t feature only Twitter memorabilia, either. Espresso machines, televisions, bicycle-powered charging stations, ergonomically correct desks and pizza ovens were also sold.

Nick Dove from Heritage Global Partners said that despite the auction’s success, it would do little to address Twitter’s dire financial predicament.

“If anyone genuinely thinks that the revenue from selling a couple computers and chairs will pay for the mountain there, then they’re a moron,” Mr Dove told the BBC.

Mr Musk said in November that the massive drop in revenue was “due to activist groups pressuring advertisers, even though nothing has changed with content moderation, and we did everything we could to appease the activists”.