UK given ‘listed status’ by EU to continue exporting animal products

David Hughes, PA Political Editor
·1-min read

Exports of meat, fish and dairy products to the European Union will be able to continue beyond January 1 after the United Kingdom was granted “national listed status”.

The measure means live animals and products of animal origin can be supplied to the EU after Brussels confirmed the UK met health and biosecurity standards.

The EU has also agreed to the exports of many plants and plant products can continue being exported to the bloc and Northern Ireland.

But seed potatoes – an important Scottish export – will be banned, leading Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon to condemn the “disastrous” outcome.

UK chief veterinary officer Christine Middlemiss said: “Third country listed status demonstrates our very high standards of biosecurity and animal health which we will continue to maintain after the end of the transition period.”

Businesses in the £5 billion animal export market will face some red tape in order to continue exporting, including the need for a health certificate.

While potatoes destined for European dinner plates can continue to be exported, those used as seed crops cannot be.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said it will not be possible to export seed potatoes to the EU or Northern Ireland from January 1 but officials were working with the European Commission on the issue.

Ms Sturgeon said it was a “disastrous Brexit outcome for Scottish farmers” and “like all other aspects of Brexit, foisted on Scotland against our will”.