UK households with hedges in front or back garden face £1,000 fines

UK households who have hedges face brutal £1000 fines for letting them overgrow into roads. Graham Conway, Managing Director of vehicle financing firm Select Car Leasing, has warned motorists, drivers and road users over the problem.

He explained: "The damp, humid start to summer means hedges, bushes, trees, grass and other foliage are running rampant, taking advantage of the inclement conditions to enjoy rapid growth.

“That’s great for wildlife, including our bees, but not so great for motorists having to crane their neck at junctions to get a view of incoming traffic or who can’t see cars approaching a roundabout because there’s a green screen in the way."

READ MORE UK tourists in Tenerife warned to pay £340 or face 'sleeping in a tent'

He advised: "I’d urge all UK motorists to be hyper vigilant right now, and throughout the summer months. If you can’t get a clear view of traffic at a junction, don’t be tempted to simply pull out and risk it. If you can, try to reposition your car so that you get a better view before proceeding with caution."

According to the Highways Act of 1980, owners of shrubbery must make sure that trees and hedges do not extend into the road, blocking the view of users. Those found to be breaking this law without the lawful authority to do so could face a fine of up to £1,000.

The Highway Authority may serve notice requiring the cutting or felling of a hedge, tree or shrub which endangers, obstructs or interferes with the passage of vehicles or pedestrians, including the view of drivers or the light from a street lamp. The work is required be carried out within 14 days.

The Act warns: "Where a hedge, tree or shrub overhangs a highway or any other road or footpath to which the public has access so as to endanger or obstruct the passage of vehicles or pedestrians, or obstructs or interferes with the view of drivers of vehicles or the light from a public lamp, or overhangs a highway so as to endanger or obstruct the passage of horse-riders, a competent authority may, by notice either to the owner of the hedge, tree or shrub or to the occupier of the land on which it is growing, require him within 14 days from the date of service of the notice so to lop or cut it as to remove the cause of the danger, obstruction or interference."