Ukraine beat Scotland to keep World Cup hopes alive in their first competitive match since war started

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Ukraine have beaten Scotland 3-1 at Hampden Park to keep their World Cup dream alive, in an emotional qualifying play-off semi-final match in Glasgow.

Played against the backdrop of the ongoing war, the game began with a show of solidarity from Scottish fans as some of them joined the visitors in singing Ukraine's national anthem before kick-off.

Ukraine were backed by 3,500 fans and started with six players who have not played a competitive game this year after the domestic league was halted for a winter break in December and never resumed after Russia's invasion.

The visitors had the better of the first half, with Scotland's 39-year-old goalkeeper Craig Gordon making several saves to keep the home side in the game.

However, West Ham forward Andriy Yarmolenko gave his side the lead midway through the first half and they strengthened their grip on the tie early in the second half, with Benfica's Roman Yaremchuk making it 2-0.

Scotland scored with around 10 minutes to play, but Ukraine finished with a goal from Artem Dovbyk in added time to make it 3-1.

At full-time, the Ukrainian players celebrated with their fans, who will hope their side can seal a place at Qatar 2022.

Ukraine will now play Wales on 5 June at the Cardiff City Stadium for a place at the World Cup, with the winners joining England, Iran and the United States in Group B.

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After the match, Manchester City's Oleksandr Zinchenko told Sky Sports: "Everyone knows the situation in Ukraine and every game for us is like a final.

"We dream as a team to be at the World Cup and we need to win it otherwise this game won't mean anything."

He described the Wales game as a "massive match".

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