HIV/AIDS game changer: the quick self-test

SCRIPT:

Getting checked for HIV/AIDS -- it's now as easy in the US as taking a pregnancy test. Since FDA approval and a commercial launch last October, OraQuick can be found in some 30,000 drugstores across America. It costs 40 dollars. The user swipes the gumline. And in 20 minutes, gets an answer: HIV-positive, or AIDS-free.

SOUNDBITE 1 Dr. Anita Radix (woman), HIV clinician, Callen Lorde Community Health Center (English, sec):

"It's just like a pregnancy test. Two lines means you're positive, and one line is a control. It's a reliable test, but you have to follow the directions."

Rule one: antibodies that show HIV's presence can only be detected three months after infection.

Some worry that learning about HIV status is too distressing to handle alone, like with the take-home test. But that's a risk worth taking, says HIV clinican Dr. Anita Radix.

SOUNDBITE 2 Dr. Anita Radix (woman), HIV clinician, Callen Lorde Community Health Center (English, sec):

"Remember, when the pregnancy tests were first available over the counter, people had a lot of concerns. 'Well, what if people don't use it properly? What if a young girl finds out she's pregnant? Maybe she's suicidal.' But now, it's available everywhere."

An estimated 20 percent of HIV-positive people still don't know they're infected -- and hopes are that this easy and confidential test can finally reach them:

SOUNDBITE 3 Mark Milano (man), HIV Treatment Educator, AIDS Community Research Initiative of America (ACRIA) (English, sec):

"We know, in certain communities, communities of color, a lot of men who have ses with men don't identify even as gay, and haven't spoken to anybody about it ever. So those people who are never going to talk to their doctor about it, or who are not in care at all, are hopefully going to find out whether they have HIV or not.")

At this gay underground club in New York...

UPSOUND Hunter Vreeland, owner of Paddles, opens door: "Hello!"

There are sex games of all sorts --

UPSOUND Hunter Vreeland, owner of Paddles (English):

"Here we have some cages for people... people like to be tied up some times..."

-- but also a HIV testing room where anyone can make a speedy check with OraQuick:

SOUNDBITE 4 Hunter Vreeland (man), owner Paddles club (English, sec):

"I can't change their behavior. I'm not their mother, I'm not their conscience. but I think that if I give the test, I've done something good."

It's not full protection from HIV infection -- but self-testing can give self-knowledge when you need it most.

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SHOTLIST:

NEW YORK, APRIL 3, 2013, SOURCE: AFPTV

- Two exterior shots of New York drug store

- MS and CU of Oraquick test on sale (next to pregnancy kits and condoms)

- Oraquick box is scanned at register

HANDOUT FOOTAGE, UNDATED, SOURCE: ORASURE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

*NO RESALE for non-editorial purposes*

- Shot of hands holding OraQuick box with information inside

- Two shots of man doing oral swipe with OraQuick HIV test

NEW YORK, APRIL 3, 2013, SOURCE: AFPTV

- CU of OraQuick sticks showing both positive and negative results of HIV test [cuts away on SOUNDBITE 1]

- SOUNDBITE 1 Dr. Anita Radix, HIV Clinician, Callen Lorde Community Health Center

- MS health workers and Dr. Radix at Callen Lorde Community Health Center

- Sign at health center

- MS health workers at counter

- Radix walks down hallway

- SOUNDBITE 2 Dr. Anita Radix, HIV Clinician, Callen Lorde Community Health Center

- VAR street shots of New York

- CU of AIDS Community Research Initiative of America (ACRIA) logo

- SOUNDBITE 3 Mark Milano, HIV Treatment Educator, AIDS Community Research Initiative of America (ACRIA)

- Exterior door at Paddles club in Chelsea is opened by ownwer Hunter Vreeland

- Vreeland with upsound describes S&M apparatus at club

- MS sexual bondage painting on wall

- SOUNDBITE 4 Hunter Vreeland, owner of S&M club Paddles

- CU of Paddles written on wall of club

- Hunter Vreeland at club