Village takes on BT over plans to remove phone box which saved it from the Nazis

Telegraph Reporters
A village want to save its beloved red telephone box - because it helped protect them from the Nazis.  - Getty Images

A village want to save its beloved red telephone box - because it helped protect them from the Nazis.

The phone box in the quiet village of Bryn-y-Gwenin, near Abergavenny, South Wales, was used to warn of air raids during World War II.

And now the villagers want BT to save the box because of it wartime role when it was "the main point of contact" for warnings of Nazi bombing raids.

The villagers have enlisted the help of David Davies MP in their campaign to save the phone box.

Resident Paul Webb said villagers "cherished" the box, which bears the Tudor Crown of King George VI.

"One of our villagers, Richard Cox, cleans it on a weekly basis and repaints it when necessary." he said.

"The box has always been a proud landmark at the entrance to our village.

"It is an iconic part of British heritage yet sadly, these red telephone boxes are getting more and more scare in the countryside."

The phone box is a K6 model, designed to commemorate the silver jubilee of King George V, and entering production in 1936.

A spokesman for BT said: "Most people now have a mobile phone and calls made from our public telephones have fallen by around 90 per cent in the past decade.

"We consider a number of factors before consulting on the removal of payphones."