Week in Review: Edward Snowden on surveillance, transport strikes and American film celebrated in Deauville

The French resort town of Deauville celebrates American film at its 45th annual film festival; French transport workers go on strike, creating travel chaos; and Edward Snowden speaks to FRANCE 24 about the future of mass surveillance.

ARTICLES

‘Daddy killed mummy’: Women take to Paris streets with anti-femicide poster campaign

More than 250 anti-femicide posters have appeared in the streets of Paris since the end of August. The campaign was launched by women who want to pay homage to the more than 100 victims so far this year and force passers-by and public authorities to react.

Rebellious French mayors defy government by imposing illicit pesticide bans

Dozens of French mayors have taken the law into their own hands and illicitly banned pesticides near populated areas in their towns and villages. The rebel move has angered France’s agriculture minister, who says it threatens French food production.

‘Not the same as racism’: French referees told not to stop football matches over homophobia

The head of French football said he had instructed referees to stop suspending matches over homophobic abuse from fans, putting him on a collision course with the sports ministry and the football league.

Polanski wins Venice prize for film on Dreyfus Affair, a scandal that rocked France

Roman Polanski won the Venice film festival’s second-biggest prize on Saturday with An Officer and a Spy, in which the controversial director revisits the Dreyfus Affair, considered one of the largest miscarriages of justice in French history.

Trump’s art of quitting a bad deal wins some Afghan support

As the United States marked the 18th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, President Donald Trump’s promise to end America’s longest war seems unlikely. But many Afghans welcomed Trump’s recent pullout of US-Taliban talks.

Massive public transit strike over pension reforms paralyses Paris

With 10 metro lines closed and interruptions to bus and RER train lines, public transport in Paris is “extremely disrupted” on Friday.

TV SHOWS ONLINE

THE INTERVIEW

Exclusive: Edward Snowden on global mass surveillance

In an exclusive interview with FRANCE 24, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden shared his thoughts on mass surveillance around the world. He spoke to us from Russia, where he has lived in exile after leaking confidential documents on US surveillance in 2013.

French astronaut Thomas Pesquet: From the space station, 'You look at the earth and it looks so fragile'

Thomas Pesquet, France's most famous astronaut, is sponsoring Aviation Sans Frontières (Aviation Without Borders), a charity providing humanitarian assistance via aviation logistics irrespective of politics, religion, race or nationality. In this edition of "The Interview" he tells FRANCE 24 why he chose to work with this NGO and what global warming looks like from space.

ENCORE!

Film show: The delights of the Deauville American Film Festival

FRANCE 24 reports from the 45th Deauville American Film festival about the stars, the controversies and the films to check out.

Woody Allen: 'It doesn't matter if my movie isn't released in the United States'

Woody Allen, 83, is one of America's most prolific directors: For more than 60 years he has released nearly a film a year. His latest feature, "A Rainy Day in New York", opened at the Deauville American Film Festival in the French resort town despite having been shelved in the United States by Amazon.

Pierce Brosnan on James Bond, his childhood in Ireland and environmental activism

The former 007 actor Pierce Brosnan sits down with FRANCE 24 at the Deauville film festival to talk about his memories of the French seaside town, how James Bond made him who he is and why climate change is the biggest challenge facing our world today.

Sophie Turner: 'Seeing a therapist saved my life'

"Game of Thrones" actress Sophie Turner talks about her new movie "Heavy", which has just premiered at the Deauville American Film Festival, as well as her memories of "GOT", the dangers of social media and why it's important to speak out about mental health issues.

FRENCH CONNECTIONS

Domestic violence: Is France failing to protect its women?

France is one of the European countries with the highest number of femicides: It is estimated that a woman is killed by her partner or former partner every three days. Domestic violence isn't new to France, but there's currently a collective effort by organisations for battered women to raise awareness and stop the indifference. The government has announced a series of measures to tackle the issue. But has it gone far enough?

Why does France have the lowest levels of trust in vaccines globally?

It might seem paradoxical, but France -- the home of Louis Pasteur's pioneering discoveries in immunology -- is also one of the most sceptical countries in the world when it comes to vaccines. What are the origins of this mistrust?

FASHION

Fashion and our planet: The 'deconsumerism' trend

To mark 30 years of France's Maison Mode Mediterranée, fashion designers and industry partners are looking ahead to the future of the sector. But before they consider replacing humans with artificial intelligence, up-and-coming brands have to come to grips with the daily challenges of running a label. The French company Atelier Bartavelle is a champion when it comes to sustainability, reviving local crafts from Mediterranean countries and providing a good example for other brands.

TALKING EUROPE

MP Dominic Grieve: Boris Johnson 'doesn't seem to have grasped that a prime minister is not above the law'

Our guest is Dominic Grieve, a British member of parliament and former attorney general who has set himself up for a clash with Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Grieve was expelled from the Conservative Party after his September 4 vote in favour of a law aimed at stopping a so-called no-deal Brexit. He spoke to FRANCE 24 in the wake of a ruling by Scotland’s highest court deeming Boris Johnson's prorogation of parliament "unlawful".

Nathalie Loiseau: 'We are in the middle of Brexit madness and it is extremely sad'

Our guest is Nathalie Loiseau, France's former Europe minister and now French MEP for the Renew Europe group. She spoke to FRANCE 24 during a week that's seen the UK plunge into uncharted constitutional territory. Within the space of a few days, parliament defied the government to block a no-deal Brexit by law while Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed to "die in a ditch" rather than stay in the EU beyond the October 31 deadline.

YOU ARE HERE

Fit for a prince: The castles of France's Allier region

The central French region of Allier is home to more than 500 castles. These historic buildings are difficult to maintain but the owners can count on the support of local residents. At the Château de Fourchaud, for example, some 30 enthusiastic volunteers are busy cleaning and repairing the monument. Prince Charles-Henri, a direct descendant of the Bourbons, appreciates their efforts.

PERSPECTIVE

How the Korean art of 'nunchi' could change your life

Author Euny Hong tells us about her new book, "The Power of Nunchi". Describing it as a Korean "superpower", she says nunchi is the power to read a room in seconds, to gauge people's thoughts and feelings, and to interact with the world in a way that will help you get the most out of it. One of the biggest blocks to nunchi, she says, is the smartphone: As people become increasingly afraid of silence they are quick to distract themselves and miss out on vital signals and information.

DOWN TO EARTH

Biodegradable plastic: A false promise?

Biodegradable packaging is often pitched as the environmentally friendly solution the world has been waiting for. However, so-called greener plastics don't necessarily break down as easily as marketers would have us believe. To make matters worse, biodegradable plastic can't be recycled. So if it doesn't readily disappear into nature and can't be reused, should we consider the "biodegradable" label a well-intentioned but misleading promise?