Wimbledon: Heartbreak for Cameron Norrie as he loses semi-final to Novak Djokovic

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Hopes of a British player in the men's singles final of Wimbledon are over after Cameron Norrie lost to Novak Djokovic in the semi-final.

The ninth seed lost in four sets against the favourite, despite being willed on to win by a chanting and cheering crowd on Centre Court.

Djokovic will now face Nick Kyrgios in the final on Sunday after his semi-final opponent Rafael Nadal pulled out through injury.

"I didn't start off well, [Norrie] was the better player for the first set," Djokovic said after his victory.

"I've had, in the past, many semi-final grand slams but it is never easy walking out on the court.

"Cameron didn't have much to lose, he was playing probably the tournament of his life, and obviously playing at home is never easy, but I wish him all the best. He is a great player and I have a lot of respect for him."

This marks the 32nd time Djokovic has reached a grand slam final, but he said the "job is not finished" yet.

Speaking about his upcoming match against Kyrgios, the Serbian said: "One thing is for sure there is going to be a lot of fireworks emotionally from both of us.

"It's going to be his first grand slam finals, obviously he is very very excited and he doesn't have much to lose and he is always playing like that.

"We haven't played for some time and I have never won a set off him, so hopefully it can be different this time."

Norrie was aiming to become the first British player to reach the final of Wimbledon since Andy Murray won in 2016.

He made the perfect start with a break of serve in the first game of the match, prompting a huge roar from the crowd as he leapt in the air with a pump of his fist.

Djokovic did not react in anything like the same way when he immediately retrieved the break.

But Norrie went on to break the top seed twice more to win the opening set 6-2.

The second set was much closer until Norrie slipped on the court and lost form, with Djokovic winning 6-3.

Djokovic then broke Norrie again at the start of the third set, going on to win it 6-2.

Norrie battled back admirably in the fourth set, but Djokovic eased ahead and won it 6-4.

After the final unreturnable serve on match point, Djokovic turned towards a section of spectators and blew them kisses, earning a chorus of boos, before celebrating reaching an eighth Wimbledon final.

British hopes alive

It comes after Britain's Alfie Hewett captivated Wimbledon with a remarkable comeback to reach his first men's wheelchair singles final.

The crowd at Court One exploded as Hewett staged his extraordinary turnaround to beat Gustavo Fernandez of Argentina 2-6 7-6 (7-3) 6-4.

The world number two now meets Japanese top seed Shingo Kunieda in Sunday's final.

"That was incredible - I've never experienced anything like this before," said the 24-year-old in an emotional on-court interview.

After his quarter-final win on Thursday, Hewett had said he was disappointed it had been played on Court 14 and not a "show" court.

And just hours before the match, a switch was made.

"I was actually asleep at 9.30 last night and I kept getting phone calls from the referee," Hewett said.

"I thought it's probably nothing important, just leave it - and it was actually a court change to Court One so once I found that out I didn't get much sleep after that!"

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