In their words – England fans respond to the Euro 2020 semi-final

·3-min read
Fans watching England v Denmark (PA Wire)
Fans watching England v Denmark (PA Wire)

England fans watching the crunch Euro 2020 match with Denmark went through an array of emotions on Wednesday night.

They were given a lift when Denmark captain Simon Kjaer conceded an own goal on half-time to send the two teams in level.

Fans in Trafalgar Square were sent into raptures and began chanting “Come on England” and “It’s coming home.”

One fan, Carl Afinwayo, 23, from Croydon south London, told the PA news agency: “Oh my word, it’s insane, we needed that – we needed to equalise.

Sterling has had a great tournament as well, he should be knighted.”

Fans watching England v Denmark (PA Wire)
Fans watching England v Denmark (PA Wire)

Charlotte Paddock, 29, an emergency planner watching the game at BOXPARK in Croydon, said: “That was amazing, Sterling is going to get a hat-trick.

“I was gutted when the first goal went in and we’ve been playing defensively but it’s good and we’re going to win it.”

Ms Paddock added that she had come to London originally to go to the theatre, but had abandoned her plan to watch the football instead.

Ryan Demeza, 22, a retail manager from Hastings, also watching in Croydon, said: “I’m absolutely buzzing.

“The whole place erupted. We’d been feeling quite rubbish but we’re going to win it now for sure.”

Emily Chetty, 30, a social worker from Lewisham, said: “We were a bit nervous when it happened but we got it back and we’re really happy now.

“We need (Aston Villa forward) Jack Grealish, bring him on and we’ll win it for sure.”

Fans watching England v Denmark (PA Wire)
Fans watching England v Denmark (PA Wire)

The atmosphere was electric at Waxy’s Little Sister in Leicester Square as England as fans jumped, screamed and clapped with joy as the equaliser went in and England’s hopes were renewed.

Sam Yevko, 23, from Salisbury, said: “We never lost faith, we feel absolutely ecstatic after that goal.

“An own goal from the captain (Denmark’s Simon Kjaer) is all we needed just to turn it around, bring on the second half.”

Just 10 minutes earlier, England fans’ hopes had been dashed.

Ricky Thompson, 29, a window fitter from Milton Keynes watching the game at BOXPARK in Croydon, said he was “gutted” after Demark pulled ahead with a fine free-kick.

“(England goalkeeper Jordan) Pickford should have saved that,” he said.

“And the referee shouldn’t have given a free kick in the first place.

“I’m gutted, really gutted but still confident. Come on England.”

Fans watching England v Denmark (PA Wire)
Fans watching England v Denmark (PA Wire)

English professional footballer Adebayo Akinfenwa said he was not worried about “the old taboo” of a penalty shootout.

“I’m confident about the semi-final but I don’t want to overthink it,” the Wycombe Wanderers striker told the PA news agency from BOXPARK in Croydon.

Asked about his concern over penalties, he said: “It’s a new generation and I don’t think they have the old taboo on their shoulders.

“I think they’re young, they’re fearless, and they’ll see out the job.

“We’re winning the game.”

Harrison Dee, 20, a controls engineer apprentice from Stanford, Lincolnshire, was not hopeful about extra time action, after England failed to clinch victory in 90 minutes.

“Nothing will happen in extra time; it never does it’s boring and cagey and everyone always sits thin,” he told the PA news agency at BOXPARK Croydon.

“But when it goes to penalties it’ll be interesting and hopefully we’ll win it.”

And supporter Paul Richards, 56, who was watching the game at Trafalgar Square, said: “I hate this, I just want to hug someone, penalties are the worst.

“I really want to see a goal because extra time will send me over the edge – I just want the boys to get over the line.

“I’m dreading penalties, I’d rather have my teeth pulled out.”

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