World Of Work Day: School Bans Pupils Dressing As Sports Stars And YouTubers And Twitter Is Divided

Rachel Moss
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World Of Work Day: School Bans Pupils Dressing As Sports Stars And YouTubers And Twitter Is Divided

A school has sparked debate for telling parents not to let children dress as “professional sports people, pop stars or famous YouTubers” for ‘My World of Work Day.’

A school has sparked debate for telling parents not to let children dress as “professional sports people, pop stars or famous YouTubers” for ‘My World of Work Day.’

The day, taking place this year on Thursday 18 January, is designed to educate children about the world of employment and help them think about their futures.

Durrington C of E VC Junior School, in Wiltshire, sent parents a letter requesting children who wanted to dress up as celebrities should “think of their ‘Plan B’ choices” as the high profile jobs mentioned are “so hard to achieve”.

Two-time Olympic medal winner Jack Green tweeted a photo of the letter, along with the caption: “Have a read of the ‘Special Note’ and then ignore it and let your children aspire to be whatever they want to be. Thanks mum and some of my teachers for supporting my aspirations when I was young.”

Have a read of the ‘Special Note’ and then ignore it and let your children aspire to be whatever they want to be. Thanks mum and some of my teachers for supporting my aspirations when I was young! pic.twitter.com/fbfCPar12Y

January 16, 2018

The letter addressed to parents ahead of the day read: “We know that some children would love to be professional sports people or pop stars or famous YouTubers in the future.

“These are great ambitions but so hard to achieve! Because of this, on this occasion we’re not allowing these dress-up choices - instead, we’d like children to think of their ‘Plan B’ choices for future jobs.”

Green’s response received more than 4,000 likes, but not everyone agreed with his sentiments.

Trainee lawyer and England Rugby 7s player Sam Egerton commented on the thread: “I’m afraid I totally disagree with you here. Encouraging a ‘plan B’ is very responsible thing to do for children. Not everyone makes it like you, and even then, you yourself will need a plan B when the body fades.”

Egerton’s tweet also received more than 1,000 likes, but the majority of comments on the thread called on the school to “let kids be what they want to be”.

This is so sad to see! Those kids being asked to dream but not too big. They're kids! There's plenty of time for life to step in and trample all over dreams when you're older! Sheesh

January 16, 2018

I wanted to be a singing mermaid when I was little. That isn't a real job, but my parents still encouraged me. Today I sing & voice act professionally & have actually voiced a mermaid in a game! When we get older we figure out how to adapt our dreams. Encouragement is key! ]]>😊

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