New York Mayor Eric Adams Makes Statement About Gun Violence With Met Gala Jacket

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Photo credit: John Shearer - Getty Images
Photo credit: John Shearer - Getty Images

New York Mayor Eric Adams has taken a leaf out of US representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s book and made a rare but necessary political statement at the Met Gala 2022.

On Monday night Adams walked the red carpet with his partner Travcey Collins in a waistcoat emblazoned with the phrase ‘End Gun Violence’ on the back following last month’s Brooklyn subway shooting, which resulted in 10 people being severely injured.

Ahead of the Gala, Adam’s office confirmed his attendance to the New York Times, stating: ‘While he will celebrate American fashion, he also recognises the fraught history of the Gilded Age.’

Photo credit: Dimitrios Kambouris - Getty Images
Photo credit: Dimitrios Kambouris - Getty Images

This year’s dress code, ‘Gilded Glamour and White Tie’, pays tribute to the period of rapid growth and development in the from 1870 to 1890, however many of the event’s critics have accused the event out being out of touch given the current state of the US economy and global political issues.

One Twitter user previously tweeted: ‘Am I the only one who thinks this years #MetGala theme is out of touch? inequality is at the highest levels since the Gilded Age, a pandemic & economic meltdown wrecked us, inflation is out of control … but cool, let’s wear #GildedAge themed dresses & laugh about inequality … this year’s theme is a slap in the face to average Americans. [sic]’

Another touched on the ongoing Russian – Ukrainian war and referred to the quote regularly attributed to the French queen Marie Antoinette, noting: ‘Gilded glamor at a time of war, let them eat cake. [sic]’

Last year Ocasio Cortez, who is commonly known by her nickname AOC, wore a ‘Tax the Rich’ gown by the brand Brother Vellies.

Designer Aurora James told the New York Times of the design: ‘For us it was about delivering a message, and I think given what the Met Gala is, and who the congresswoman is, and what her message really always is, we felt that it was appropriate.’

Photo credit: Sean Zanni - Getty Images
Photo credit: Sean Zanni - Getty Images

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