Ambulance service pays tribute to worker killed while responding to call

·2-min read

An ambulance service has paid tribute to a “well loved and respected” technician who died after an object pierced his vehicle’s windscreen.

Jeremy Daw, known to friends as Jack, died last month when his ambulance was struck by an object as he responded to a 999 call in Herefordshire.

The 66-year-old, who had only returned to the West Midlands Ambulance Service in January this year, was applauded by a guard of honour at his funeral on Tuesday.

Paramedics joined friends, family and locals in lining the route outside Hereford Crematorium as the funeral cortege went by.

People applauded the funeral cortège as it went by (WMAS)
People applauded the funeral cortège as it went by (WMAS)

Other members of staff stood still in ambulance stations.

A spokesman for the service said: “Today we paid tribute and said goodbye to an incredibly well loved and respected colleague.

“The streets of Hereford were lined with friends, family, colleagues and members of the community wishing to pay their respects.

“From GP surgeries, the fire service, shops, and members of the public all clapping the cortege through the route.

“Thank you for joining us and Jeremy ‘Jack’s’ family to remember a wonderful man.”

Jeremy Daw funeral
Mr Daw was described as a ‘well loved’ colleague (WMAS)

Mr Daw, described as a “remarkable character” and “one of life’s good guys”, died at the scene of the incident.

West Mercia Police said they were “satisfied” that the incident was not the result of a “deliberate act”.

NHS chief executive Sir Simon Stevens had previously said in a statement: “After almost three decades’ service, he returned to the frontline from a well-earned retirement to help patients during the coronavirus pandemic, and served as a mentor to younger colleagues.

“On behalf of everyone across the NHS, our heartfelt condolences go to Jeremy’s family, friends and colleagues, as we also wish his crewmate a swift recovery.”

West Midlands Ambulance Service emergency operations delivery director Nathan Hudson said Mr Daw’s death was a “tragic accident”.

He said the ambulance was responding to a 999 “category two” call shortly before 8am on April 24 when it was struck by an object near the junction of Moreton Road and the A49, north of Hereford.

Mr Hudson described Mr Daw, who had 29 years experience with the ambulance service and was from Hereford, as a “remarkable character”.

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