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Residents leave ‘use your own street’ notes on cars in parking space row

The extensive, typed notes were placed on several vehicles on British Road in Bedminster.

One note accused the driver of lying about working for BT in the row about parking. (Reach)
One note accused the driver of lying about working for BT in the row about parking. (Reach)

Residents in Bristol are embroiled in a parking spaces row that has seen notes placed on windscreens warning car owners to “park in your own street”.

The “sinister” notes were placed on several vehicles on British Road in Bedminster and seemingly written on behalf of those who live there.

It read: “Dear vehicle owner/driver, The residents of British Road have noticed that you park on this street regularly, yet do not live on this street.

“Please be mindful of the residents who wish to park near their own properties. We respectfully ask you to park your vehicle on the street that you live on, in future,” it ended.”

Notes have been posted on cars on British Road in Bedminster as tensions over parking spaces escalate. (Reach)
Notes have been posted on cars on British Road in Bedminster as tensions over parking spaces escalate. (Reach)

One van, that had a ‘BT engineer on call’ sign placed inside, was seen with a hand-written note that read: “You do not work for BT!!!”

Another note claimed that a van had been left unattended and added in underlined capitals: "Help yourself."

Tensions among residents in the area have risen in recent years, with cars being parked on streets by people who live elsewhere.

But one resident of British Road, who wished to remain anonymous, said she was concerned by the appearance of the notes over the weekend.

The dispute over parking spaces has been escalating for residents on British Road in Bedminster, Bristol. (Google)
The dispute over parking spaces has been escalating for residents on British Road in Bedminster, Bristol. (Google)

She said: “Parking is an absolute nightmare around here, and people spend a lot of time driving around looking for a space, so I understand people get frustrated, but this is a bit sinister.

“Whoever wrote this does not speak for everyone on this road at all. How do they know the people who own those vehicles don’t live nearby?

"Do they keep watch all the time, and then follow them to see where they go when they park up?

Residents have taken to posting notes in their windows to deny being behind the messages left on cars. (Reach)
Residents have taken to posting notes in their windows to deny being behind the messages left on cars. (Reach)

“As a woman driver, I’d be worried if that appeared on my car, wondering who was following me to check where I lived.”

The resident said that residents were often forced to park further away but said the road was “everyone’s”.

She added: “There’s no residents’ parking scheme here, there’s no restrictions, people can park where they like for however long they want.

“If this notice-writer wants to guarantee they can park their car outside their home, they need to move to a house with its own drive.”

Last year, Avon Fire and Rescue Service warned that some of the streets around Bedminster were inaccessible to fire engines in an emergency because of people parking on street corners or on both sides of the narrowest roads.

What are the new driving laws in the UK in 2023?

Several new driving laws have been announced over the past few years, with many introduced in 2023.

Fines of up to £180 can be imposed if drivers break some of the new rules, that are being introduced both in specific areas and nationwide.

Among the rules are a ban on pavement parking in Scotland later this year, which has been delayed since its announcement in 2019.

All residential roads in Wales will have a 20mph speed limit from 17 September, in an effort to improve road safety and air quality, while also reducing noise pollution.

The controversial ultra low emission zone (ULEZ) scheme is still on course to roll out across all London boroughs from 29 August – meaning a £12.50 charge being imposed on any vehicle that exceeds the minimum emissions standards for every day that it is used.

Meanwhile, Manchester, Tyneside and Sheffield will all introduce clean air zones, meaning vehicles being charged for exceeding the new emission standard.