Covid-19 Australia data tracker: coronavirus cases today, trend map, hospitalisations and deaths

·5-min read

Due to the difference in reporting times between states, territories and the federal government, it can be difficult to get a current picture of how many confirmed cases of coronavirus there are in Australia, where cases are increasing or decreasing, and the overall trend for each state and territory.

Here, we’ve brought together all the figures in one place for Australia as a whole, as well as more information on the states with current Omicron outbreaks.

You can use the table of contents to jump to a specific section:

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National statistics: cases, deaths and hospitalisation

Here you can see a summary of the overall situation, including the current status of the Covid vaccine booster rollout. For more information about vaccinations, you can check out our dedicated vaccine rollout page.

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This chart shows the number of Covid cases announced daily, for all of Australia. Unlike some of the other charts on this page it does not distinguish between cases reported from rapid antigen tests (RAT) and cases reported from PCR tests, and does not backdate RAT case numbers.

Due to the change in testing criteria on 5 January 2022, and difficulties in testing access in mid-December, case numbers should be considered to be an underestimate of the actual number.

Australia case numbers

This chart shows the number of people with Covid in hospital for all of Australia, as well as a threshold showing 15% of the hospital capacity, as set by the Australian government’s common operating picture document:

Australia hospitalisation chart

Here you can see the number of people who have died each day due to Covid, and the trend in deaths over time:

deaths australia

NSW Covid outbreak and trend in Sydney LGA cases

This chart shows the number of reported cases in NSW, split by testing type. Numbers for PCR-confirmed cases since the testing criteria changeover are likely to be more reliable than the rapid antigen test (RAT)-derived numbers, as RAT tests remain difficult to obtain in NSW.

All numbers from mid-December onwards should be considered to be an underestimate of actual case numbers due to difficulties in accessing testing and the testing criteria change:

NSW cases by testing type

Here, you can see the number of hospitalisations in NSW versus hospital capacity thresholds set by the federal government:

NSW hospitalisations

Cases are not distributed around the state equally. This map shows where cases are growing or declining around NSW, and the number of recent cases. You can toggle between showing just Sydney, or the entire state, and switch between circles sized by the number of recent cases, or shading the LGA areas by the trend in cases:

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If you want to see the trend in more detail at the LGA level, you can use the charts here. Use the button to rescale the chart and compare trajectories between LGAs.

Victoria Covid outbreak and trend in Melbourne LGA cases

This chart shows the number of reported cases in Victoria, split by testing type. Numbers for PCR-confirmed cases since the testing criteria changeover are likely to be more reliable than the rapid antigen test (RAT)-derived numbers, as RAT tests remain difficult to obtain in Victoria.

All numbers from mid-December onwards should be considered to be an underestimate of actual case numbers due to difficulties in accessing testing and the testing criteria change:

Victoria cases by testing type

Here, you can see the number of hospitalisations in Victoria versus hospital capacity thresholds set by the federal government:

Victoria hospitalisations

This map shows where cases are growing around Victoria, with circles coloured to show if cases are increasing or decreasing in the area, and sized by the total number of recent cases in that area:

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You can see the trend in more detail at the LGA level with the following chart series. Use the button to rescale the chart and compare trajectories between LGAs.

Queensland Covid outbreak

This chart shows the number of reported cases in Queensland, split by testing type. Numbers for PCR-confirmed cases since the testing criteria changeover are likely to be more reliable than the rapid antigen test-derived numbers, as RAT tests remain difficult to obtain in Queensland.

All numbers January onwards should be considered to be an underestimate of actual case numbers due to the testing criteria change:

QLD covid cases by testing type

Here, you can see the number of hospitalisations in Queensland versus hospital capacity thresholds set by the federal government:

Queensland hospitalisation numbers

South Australia Covid outbreak

This chart shows daily reported cases in South Australia. There is no data available to distinguish cases from PCR testing or RAT testing:

SA cases daily

Here, you can see the number of hospitalisations in South Australia versus hospital capacity thresholds set by the federal government:

SA hospitalisation

Tasmania Covid outbreak

This chart shows daily reported cases in Tasmania. Cases by testing type will be added shortly:

Tasmania daily cases

Here, you can see the number of hospitalisations in Tasmania versus hospital capacity thresholds set by the federal government:

Tasmania hospitalisations

ACT Covid outbreak

This chart shows daily reported cases in the ACT. Cases by testing type will be added shortly:

ACT daily cases

Here, you can see the number of hospitalisations in the ACT versus hospital capacity thresholds set by the federal government:

ACT hospitalisations

Northern Territory Covid outbreak

This chart shows daily reported cases in the NT. Cases by testing type will be added when available:

NT cases daily

Due to the unprecedented and ongoing nature of the coronavirus outbreak, this article is being regularly updated to ensure that it reflects the current situation at the date of publication. Any significant corrections made to this or previous versions of the article will continue to be footnoted in line with Guardian editorial policy.

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