Advertisement

Da’Vine Joy Randolph pleads for ‘contributions’ so she can get Oscars tickets for family!

Da’Vine Joy Randolph has pleaded for contributions so she can get five extra tickets for the Oscars so her family can attend the ceremony credit:Bang Showbiz
Da’Vine Joy Randolph has pleaded for contributions so she can get five extra tickets for the Oscars so her family can attend the ceremony credit:Bang Showbiz

Da’Vine Joy Randolph has pleaded for contributions so she can get five extra tickets for the Oscars so her family can attend the ceremony.

The 37-year-old ‘Holdovers’ actress is up for a best supporting actress for playing grieving mum Mary in Alexander Payne’s comedy drama about a bunch of schoolboys marooned in school over Christmas, and in London on Sunday (18.02.24) she was handed a BAFTA in the same category for her role in the movie.

She said on ‘Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen’ about the upcoming Oscars, which will be held on 10 March at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood, Los Angeles: “If anyone would like to contribute to giving me an additional ticket that you may not need… I need five tickets.”

Da’Vine made her initial comments about wanting to get more plus-ones for the ceremony in an interview with Vanity Fair earlier this month, telling the magazine: “They’re telling me I may only have one extra ticket, so that’s my mission.

“Can you imagine the people in your life that are, like, ‘I want to come!’ And you’re, like, ‘And you should come because you’ve helped me significantly in my life.’

“If I can get five – I don’t care if my people are back there (on the balcony), I don’t need five people in my row.

“Get Oscar tickets, or buy Oscar tickets, whatever we’ve got to do – I have some family members that would be very upset, so I’ve got to figure that out.”

‘The Holdovers’ has a total of five Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, and Da’Vine said at the BAFTAs she became fixated on portraying the “complexities” of an “average woman” in her part.

She said on the red carpet of London’s Royal Festival Hall about her character, who is devastated over the death of her child in the movie: “It was extremely important to show an average woman and to show all the nuances and all the complexities of what it is to be a woman, and a woman in the working class and a woman in a male dominated world.”