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Eagles book residency at Las Vegas Sphere to extend ‘Long Goodbye’ tour: sources

The Eagles have landed.

The legendary rock band has agreed to a residency at James Dolan’s Las Vegas music venue The Sphere after they finish up what was billed as their final tour this spring, The Post has learned.

Don Henley — the band’s frontman who recently expressed “regret” over a cocaine-fueled night with a 16-year-old prostitute while taking the stand in a criminal case involving the theft of the lyrics to their hit song “Hotel California” — will take the stage along with Joe Walsh and Timothy B. Schmit over 10 weekends from September through December at the $2.3 billion state-of-the-art arena, sources close to the situation told The Post.

The total number of shows and terms of the deal have yet to be disclosed.

Don Henley and his Eagles last tour includes nesting at The Sphere. Dave J Hogan/Getty Images
Don Henley and his Eagles last tour includes nesting at The Sphere. Dave J Hogan/Getty Images

“We do not comment on any artists performing at Sphere except for those who have been announced,” a Sphere spokesperson told The Post on Monday.

The Post reached out to the Eagles for comment.

The band concludes its “Long Goodbye” tour on June 15 in the Netherlands.

Dolan, the owner of the Knicks and Rangers, has been courting the Eagles, managed by longtime Dolan pal Irving Azoff, since last year, The Post previously reported.

Azoff co-founded the Oak View Group, which handles marketing partnerships for The Sphere, and also manages Dead & Company’s John Mayer, the Eagles and U2, which all have been booked to play the glitzy venue.

Mayer and the Grateful Dead spinoff band were scheduled to play 24 shows from May to July but have extended their stay by another 10 dates through the end of August, sources said.

However, Dolan’s efforts to bring Beyonce to the LED-wrapped arena have apparently hit a snag — at least for this year.

The Sphere has quickly become a Las Vegas landmark. TNS
The Sphere has quickly become a Las Vegas landmark. TNS

The two have held talks since last November, with Queen Bey, her husband, Jay-Z, and her manager-mom, Tina Knowles, all touring the site, as The Post previously reported.

Buzz about a possible deal surged last month when the “Single Ladies” singer was featured in a Super Bowl ad for Verizon — showing Beyonce on a horse that was perched atop The Sphere.

The hang-up for a deal could be over Dolan’s hesitancy to splash out the millions needed to attract Beyonce and produce the high-tech shows that fit The Sphere, once source speculated.

Beyoncé and Dolan have apparently been unable to strike a deal on bringing the superstar singer to The Sphere. WireImage for Parkwood
Beyoncé and Dolan have apparently been unable to strike a deal on bringing the superstar singer to The Sphere. WireImage for Parkwood

The media mogul paid roughly $10 million to U2 for their extravagant production to open the arena last September. Bono and the band closed the last of their 40 shows earlier this month.

Shares in the Dolan-run parent company that owns The Sphere are up more than 40% year to date. They were down slightly on Monday, trading at around $47.

Henley, meanwhile, had taken a break from the Eagles tour earlier this month to testify in a Manhattan court in a trial involving three men accused of a scheme involving the allegedly stolen “Hotel California” lyrics.

The case” imploded mid-trial after Henley disclosed new evidence that cast doubt on the prosecution.

Bob Weir’s Dead & Co. is extending their Sphere stay by ten shows. Getty Images for The Michael J. Fox Foundation
Bob Weir’s Dead & Co. is extending their Sphere stay by ten shows. Getty Images for The Michael J. Fox Foundation

In a stunning turn of events, Justice Curtis Farber dropped the charges faced by rare-books dealer Glenn Horowitz, ex-Rock & Roll Hall of Fame curator Craig Inciardi and memorabilia seller Edward Kosinki — finding that Henley “manipulated” Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg’s office by failing to turn over 6,000 pages of key evidence until midway through the trial.

Henley and his lawyers tried to weaponize their attorney-client privilege to “hide information that they believed would be damaging,” Farber said at a hearing in Manhattan Supreme Court on March 6.

Eagles co-founder Don Henley on Monday candidly recounted the cocaine-fueled night when he was busted with a 16-year-old prostitute at his Los Angeles home — calling it a “regret” he still lives with more than four decades later as he took the stand in Manhattan court.

While taking the stand, the 76-year-old Henley was asked about his 1980 arrest shortly after the band broke up.

Henley admitted the breakup made him depressed, prompting him to call a “madam” to provide him with “some company.”

Among those was an underage prostitute who suffered a seizure after a night of coke-fueled commiserating, he admitted.

“I wanted to forget about everything that was happening with the band,” Henley said. “I made a poor decision which I regret to this day. I’ve had to live with it for 44 years. I’m still living with it today in this courtroom.”