'Let me be Hev's long-lost twin': Cheryl Fergison has 'EastEnders' comeback all worked out

Katie Archer
Contributor
(Getty)

Kathy Beale, Dirty Den and Nasty Nick Cotton have all managed it - and now Cheryl Fergison wants Heather Trott to be the latest Albert Square resident to come back from the dead.

It’s a far-fetched storyline even for the world of soap, but ex-EastEnder Fergison reckons she’s come up with a genius plot that could see her popular alter ego Hev back in Walford for 2020.

Read more: EastEnders fan Lord Sugar wants to help out show

All it involves is a long-lost twin, an evil mum, and the return of Aunt Babe’s baby-selling past...

Fergison, who starred in the BBC One soap as Heather for five years, posted on Instagram the plan she’d been cooking up.

She wrote: "Ok so I’ve had lots of people asking if I could go back to @bbceastenders as Hev's long lost twin... so writers there's a challenge and actually there is a storyline that could defo make that possible...

"Remember Hev's mum ( she was a wicked one) and aunt babes terrible past story of selling babies !! ...if you would like to see this epic come back let @bbceastenders know ..."

Heather was a popular character with viewers, particularly for her storylines that included a relationship with Minty (Cliff Parisi) and the mystery identity of her baby’s father.

She was eventually killed off by Ben Mitchell who hit her on the head with a photo frame, but it sounds like there’s popular demand for her to be resurrected.

Read more: Tamzin Outhwaite is proud of EastEnders death

Kathy Beale, played by Gillian Taylforth, came back from the dead for EastEnders’ 30th anniversary, explaining that she had faked her off-screen death in a South African car crash for the insurance payout.

Dirty Den’s (Leslie Grantham) death by falling into a canal in 1989 was one of the show’s most famous scenes...until he returned in 2003 after years in Spain, but was eventually killed off for definite with an iron doorstop.

Read more: Cliff Parisi says taxman is scarier than I’m a Celeb jungle critters

Nick Cotton (John Altman) was another death-faker, who pretended to succumb to a drug overdose in 2014, but after making a brief return really did die from his heroin use, bought for him by his own mother Dot (June Brown) who ended up in prison for her actions.

So it’s not completely outside of the realms of (soapland) possibility that we could see Hev back on screen - watch this space...

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