Hurricane Ian - Live Updates: Maps show path of storm set to hit Florida

âââââââPINAR DEL RIO, CUBA - SEPTEMBER 27: Several men work on the restoration of a tobacco warehouse destroyed after Hurricane Ian hit Pinar del Rio, Cuba, on September 27, 2022 in the province of Pinar del Río, Cuba. Ian made landfall at 4:30 a.m. EDT Tuesday in Cubaâs Pinar del Rio province, where officials set up shelters, evacuated people, rushed in emergency personnel and took steps to protect crops in the nationâs main tobacco-growing region. (Photo by Yander Zamora/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
Several men work on the restoration of a tobacco warehouse destroyed after Hurricane Ian hit Pinar del Rio, Cuba. (Getty Images)

Florida residents have been boarding up their homes and packing up their vehicles as Hurricane Ian draws nearer, carrying high winds and torrential rain.

It approaches the state after slamming into Cuba - leaving the entire country without power, swamping fishing villages and forcing mass evacuations.

In its most recent update, the US National Hurricane Center (NHC) warns areas most at risk from the "life-threatening" storm are between the Naples and Sarasota regions.

Hurricane Ian was upgraded to a Category 4 storm today, meaning it risks maximum sustained winds of 140 miles per hour (220 km per hour) and more than a foot of rain in some areas.

More than 2.5 million Floridians have been told to evacuate amid warnings from the NHC of "catastrophic wind damage" at the centre of the storm.

A map shows sustained winds approaching the west coast of Florida, with catastrophic hurricane force damage at the centre of the storm. (National Hurricane Center)
A map shows sustained winds approaching the west coast of Florida, with catastrophic hurricane force damage at the centre of the storm. (National Hurricane Center)

Heavy rainfall is expected to spread through the Florida peninsula throughout Thursday, bringing "widespread, life-threatening catastrophic flooding" in the centre of the state, forecasters say.

Considerable flooding has also been predicted in southern and northern Florida, as well as southeastern Georgia and coastal South Carolina.

Ian pummelled Cuba on Tuesday and was expected to crash ashore into Florida on Wednesday evening south of Tampa Bay.

By late Tuesday night, tropical storm-force winds generated by Ian extended through the Florida Keys island chain to the southernmost shores of the state's Gulf Coast, according to the hurricane centre.

The NHC also issued storm surge warnings for much of western Florida's shoreline, predicting coastal flooding of up to 12 feet from wind-driven high surf.

Read more: Disney World closed after Hurricane Ian becomes ninth storm to shut park, stranding some tourists without refunds

Flash fooding is expected across much of Florida over the next couple of days, with other nearby states also at risk.
Flash fooding is expected across much of Florida over the next couple of days, with other nearby states also at risk. (National Hurricane Center)

"The time to evacuate is now. Get on the road," Florida's director of emergency management, Kevin Guthrie, said during a news briefing on Tuesday evening.

Governor Ron DeSantis warned evacuation would become difficult for those who waited much longer to flee because increasing winds would soon force authorities to close highway bridges.

"You need to get to higher ground, you need to get to structures that are safe," DeSantis said, adding that widespread power outages would leave millions without electricity.

US Federal Emergency Management Agency chief Deanne Criswell said she worried that too few Florida residents were taking the threat seriously.

She said: "I do have concerns about complacency. We’re talking about impacts in a part of Florida that hasn’t seen a major direct impact in nearly 100 years. There’s also parts of Florida where there’s a lot of new residents."

Read more: What are the categories of hurricane? Florida prepares to be battered by Hurricane Ian

Water levels around the coastline could reach these heights when the storm hits, forecasters predict. (National Hurricane Center)
Water levels around the coastline could reach these heights when the storm hits, forecasters predict.

Nearly 60 Florida school districts have cancelled classes due to the hurricane, while more than 175 evacuation centres were opened statewide, many of them school buildings converted to shelters.

Commercial airlines reported more than 2,000 storm-related US flight cancellations, with the St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport and Tampa International Airport shut down on Tuesday.

If Ian strikes the Tampa area, it would be the first hurricane to make landfall there since the 1921 Tarpon Springs storm.

It also may prove one of the costliest, with data modelling service Enki Research projecting storm-related damages ranging from $38 billion to more than $60 billion.

Ian moved across the southeastern edge of the Gulf of Mexico headed for Florida after ravaging Cuba with violent winds and flooding.

The storm is expected to hit Florida between Wednesday afternoon and early evening, spreading northwards throughout the week. (National Hurricane Center)
The storm is expected to hit Florida between Wednesday afternoon and early evening, spreading northwards throughout the week. (National Hurricane Center)

The Florida coastal zone at highest risk for US landfall is home to miles of sandy beaches, scores of resort hotels and numerous mobile home parks, a favourite with retirees and vacationers alike.

"We're right on the water, along a canal, so ... this could be devastating," said Melissa Wolcott Martino, a 78-year-old retired magazine editor in St. Petersburg.

She and her husband were loading valuables and pets into their car for a drive to their son's home north of Tampa on Tuesday.

Some of the city's residents, including 50-year-old software engineer Vanessa Vazquez, said they planned to ride out the storm despite the evacuation warnings.

"I'm staying put," Vazquez said. "I have four cats and I don't want to stress them out. And we have a strong house."

Live updates
  • Dylan Stableford

    The latest on Hurricane Ian

    • Ian made landfall near Cayo Costa Wednesday afternoon as a Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds near 150 mph.
    • Since downgraded to a Category 3 storm, with sustained winds of 125 mph, Ian is still packing a dangerous punch, officials warn.
    • The National Hurricane Center is predicting a "catastrophic" storm surge of up to 18 feet in some areas.
    • About 2.5 million people were ordered to evacuate ahead of the storm.
    • More than 1.8 million people are without power.
    • President Biden says he spoke with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and pledged federal help.

  • David Knowles
  • David Knowles

    Ian's winds start to diminish, but could remain 'near hurricane strength' across Florida

    After making landfall Wednesday as a Category 4 storm with sustained winds measuring 150 m.p.h., Hurricane Ian continued to lose strength hours later as it creeped inland, the National Hurricane Center said in its 8 p.m. ET bulletin.

    While Ian's maximum sustained winds have now dropped to 115 m.p.h., the storm is still more than powerful enough to cause a variety of threats, including wind damage and flash-flooding, and it may remain a hurricane during its entire journey across the state.

    "Ian is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale," the National Hurricane Center said in its bulletin. "Further weakening is expected for the next day or so, but Ian could be near hurricane strength when it moves over the Florida East coast tomorrow, and when it approaches the northeastern Florida, Georgia and South Carolina coasts on Friday."

    The storm will head north and east across the state tonight, the Hurricane Center said, before emerging "over the western Atlantic by late Thursday." From there, it will turn north, where it could threaten several states with storm surge and heavy rain.

  • David Knowles
  • David Knowles
  • David Knowles

    Hurricane Ian knocks out power to 1.8 million in Florida

    More than 1.8 million Floridians have lost power since Hurricane Ian pushed ashore as a Category 4 storm Wednesday.

    While the storm was downgraded Wednesday evening by the National Hurricane Center to a Category 3 storm, power outages continued to rise as is moved inland. As of 7:45 p.m. ET, 1,803,012 customers were without power in the state, according to according to PowerOutage.US, a website that tracks electricity providers in each state.

    Still packing sustained winds of 125 m.p.h., Ian will like force many more in the state to get by without electricity in the hours to come.

  • David Knowles
  • David Knowles

    Video shot earlier in the day from Naples, Fla.

  • David Knowles
  • David Knowles

    Hurricane Ian downgraded to Category 3 storm

    Hours after making landfall near Ft. Meyers as a massive Category 4 storm along Florida's Gulf Coast, Hurricane Ian was officially downgraded to a Category 3 storm as it began to move across the the middle portion of the state Wednesday evening.

    Ian's maximum sustained winds were 125 miles-per-hour, the National Hurricane Center said in its 7 p.m. advisory, but higher wind gusts have been reported in towns like Punta Gorda.

    As night fell on Florida, more than 1.6 million residents were without power, according to PowerOutage.US, a website that tracks electricity providers in each state.

  • David Knowles