Advertisement

John Mulaney a 'huge pillar of strength' for Olivia Munn

John Mulaney a 'huge pillar of strength' for Olivia Munn credit:Bang Showbiz
John Mulaney a 'huge pillar of strength' for Olivia Munn credit:Bang Showbiz

John Mulaney has been a "huge pillar of strength" for his girlfriend Olivia Munn during her battle with breast cancer.

The 43-year-old actress revealed on Instagram last week that she was diagnosed with the disease last year after undergoing a series of tests, which ultimately led to her having a double mastectomy, and John and their son Malcolm, two, have been helping her through the ordeal.

A source told Us Weekly: "John has been a huge pillar of strength for Olivia throughout her health scare. Malcolm also gave Olivia the courage and strength to keep fighting and overcome this."

Another insider added that sharing her story was an “important” way for Olivia to help “raise awareness with the hopes more women will get themselves tested".

The 'Newsroom' actress took to Instagram to explain she had undergone genetic testing that screened for "90 different cancer genes" and was relieved for them all to come back negative, only for a simple risk assessment then flagging that she had an almost 40 percent chance of developing cancer within her lifetime.

This prompted her to undergo an MRI which led to further tests confirming the disease.

She wrote: "I wouldn't have found my cancer for another year at my next scheduled mammogram - except that my OBGYN, Dr. Thaïs Aliabadi, decided to calculate my Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Score. The fact that she did saved my life.

"Dr. Aliabadi looked at factors like my age, familial breast cancer history, and the fact that I had my first child after the age of 30. She discovered my lifetime risk was at 37%. Because of that score I was sent to get an MRI, which led to an ultrasound, which then led to a biopsy.

"The biopsy showed I had Luminal B cancer in both breasts. Luminal B is an aggressive, fast moving cancer."

Olivia concluded her post by reflecting that she went from feeling "completely fine" one day to being in surgery the next and noted that she has been "lucky" but urged other women to undergo a Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Score and to take action if their score is revealed to be more than 20 per cent.

She added: "30 days after that biopsy I had a double mastectomy. I went from feeling completely fine one day, to waking up in a hospital bed after a 10-hour surgery the next.

"I'm lucky. We caught it with enough time that I had options. I want the same for any woman who might have to face this one day.

"Ask your doctor to calculate your Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Score. Dr. Aliabadi says that If the number is greater than 20 per cent, you need annual mammograms and breast MRIs starting at age 30."