Liam Gallagher says he once drove a combine harvester to spy on The Stone Roses

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Liam Gallagher performs at The O2 Arena on November 28, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Lorne Thomson/Redferns)
Liam Gallagher performs at The O2 Arena on November 28, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Lorne Thomson/Redferns)

Liam Gallagher has claimed he once drove a combine harvester to spy on The Stone Roses in the 90s.

The singer has said it happened while Oasis were recording 1994 album Definitely Maybe at Rockfield Studios in Monmouthshire, only to hear their fellow Mancunians playing nearby.

In BBC 4 documentary Rockfield: The Studio On The Farm, Gallagher, 47, explains he went off to investigate with bandmate Paul Arthurs, also known as Bonehead.

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"We went to have a f***ing little snoop,” Gallagher says, according to The Sun. “It was, ‘Right, what the f*** are they up to?’ as they hadn’t been doing anything for three years.

Ian Brown, from The Stone Roses in Rockfield, Salford Rehersal Studios for the Second Coming sessions.; 1993 'Gotcha' cover;  (Photo by Steve Brown/Photoshot/Getty Images)
Ian Brown, from The Stone Roses in Rockfield, Salford Rehersal Studios for the Second Coming sessions.; 1993 'Gotcha' cover; (Photo by Steve Brown/Photoshot/Getty Images)

“I’m on about a proper combine harvester – ones you’ve got to get a ladder up to and it’s miles up. Off we f***ing go, crawling down the road with the big f***ing lights on. It looked bonkers.”

He continued: “We drove it in, turned the lights off and rolled out like something out of The Professionals. We could hear some f***ing bassline and drums. We got caught, we went in and had a little chat."

Gallagher added that the next evening, the band "came over on a tractor" while he was in bed.

1975:  British rock band Queen (clockwise from top: Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Roger Taylor and John Deacon pose for an Electra Records publicity still to promote their album 'A Night at the Opera' in 1975.  (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)
1975: British rock band Queen (clockwise from top: Brian May, Freddie Mercury, Roger Taylor and John Deacon pose for an Electra Records publicity still to promote their album 'A Night at the Opera' in 1975. (Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

Many iconic tracks and albums have been recorded at Rockfield Studios, including Queen's landmark A Night at the Opera. Robert Plant, Motorhead and Black Sabbath are also among those to have made use of the studios.

The documentary will feature interviews with the music stars who have spent time at Rockfield as well as the Ward family who created the studios.

The Stone Roses played a big part in ensuring Rockfield's future following the recession in the late 80s, something touched upon in the film.

English rock group The Stone Roses posed in Hilversum, Netherlands in 1992. Left to right: Alan 'Reni' Wren, John Squire, Gary 'Mani' Mounfield and Ian Brown. (Photo by Michel Linssen/Redferns)
English rock group The Stone Roses posed in Hilversum, Netherlands in 1992. Left to right: Alan 'Reni' Wren, John Squire, Gary 'Mani' Mounfield and Ian Brown. (Photo by Michel Linssen/Redferns)

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Studio Manager Lisa Ward shares: "I think they booked in, officially, for a couple of weeks. But they stayed. I think it was 13 months in the end that they were here. And that saved us. The Stone Roses saved Rockfield.”

Rockfield: The Studio On The Farm premieres on Saturday 18 July at 9pm on BBC Two Wales and on BBC Four across the UK.

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