London could get this £600m cycle path which 'floats' over the Thames in two years

Vision of the future: How the Thames Deckway would look. (Rex)

As London’s streets become ever more crowded with cyclists, architects have unveiled a bold solution - a cycle path which ‘floats’ over the River Thames.

The idea for the so-called Thames Deckway would see an east-west cycling route through central London on the river's north side.

The idea for the so-called Thames Deckway would see an east-west cycling route through central London on the river's north side.

Designed for commuter cyclists, leisure cyclists and pedestrians alike and completely traffic-free, it will potentially stretch for 12 kilometres along the river from Battersea to Canary Wharf, a distance that a fit cyclist can pedal in about 30 minutes.

From either Battersea or Canary Wharf to the Thames Deckway's prospective mid-point of the Millennium Bridge could take as little as 15 minutes on a bike.

The path would complement Transport for London's plan for a new east-west cycling route through central London on the river's north side by running a similar route on the south side along the river itself.

The proposed Thames Deckway will run close to the river's edge, well away from the main navigation channel, and will rise and fall gently with the Thames' tidal cycle.

There will be embankment ramps at strategic intervals and plenty of stopping points along the way to enjoy the views and relax at  refreshment kiosks.

The Thames Deckway will be able to host its own bicycle fleet, tailored specially for family use and offering infant carriages, child bicycles, tandems and tricycles for hire. Commuter cyclists only will use it during rush hours.

It will generate its own energy from a combination of sun, tide and wind and be entirely non-polluting. Safety and security of cyclists and pedestrians will be the number one priority.

Traffic density, traffic flow, river motion, river wave and any hazardous traffic or weather conditions will be monitored continuously by satellites, weather stations and on-board sensors that relay information directly to the Thames Deckway's users.

The new Thames Deckway concept is an independent environmental and social impact venture. It can be built with private investment attracted by the appeal of its long-term financial return prospects.

River Cycleway's financial projections show that it will cost approximately £600 million to build from Battersea to Canary Wharf.

With a flat rate single ticket price in the region of £1.50, it has considerable potential as a generator of healthy, sustained revenues. A team behind the project is in formation led by a new company, River Cycleway Consortium Ltd.

 The team so far includes Britain's leading engineering firm Arup, developers of innovative structures that include the Sydney Opera House and  Centre Pompidou in Paris and Hugh Broughton Architects, designers of the acclaimed Halley VI Antarctic Research Station.





























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