Marvel's Dave Bautista confirmed to team up with Aquaman's Jason Momoa on See season 2

Sam Warner

From Digital Spy

The world's of Marvel and DC are set to collide as Guardians of the Galaxy's Dave Bautista and Aquaman's Jason Momoa team up.

Well, not in a superhero capacity but Apple TV+'s series See, with Bautista joining for the upcoming second season (via Deadline).

The show recently debuted its first season with the launch of Apple's streaming service, and is set in a distant future where humanity has succumbed to sight loss – that is until two children who can see are born to Momoa's character Baba Voss and his wife Maghra.

Photo credit: Samir Hussein/WireImage - Getty Images

The actor recently opened up about the next season with Digital Spy and other press, teasing that "it's actually pretty exciting".

"You don't want to know," Momoa said. "We went over the whole thing. It's all laid out, which is really beautiful.

"I mean, I know what mine is. Every other character has their own stuff. I didn't get into too much detail about everyone's fine details. But with mine, I'm excited."

Photo credit: Apple

He has also spoken about the making the show, explaining how "challenging" it was for the cast to embody blindness when they aren't actually blind.

"It's all digital, for our eyes," Momoa said. "But even if you didn't see that, you could see it in our acting.

"You can't just look at someone and be like, 'They'll just remove the eyes'. Even when we're fighting – or when I'm fighting – you can't look at the person."

See is now available to stream on Apple TV+.

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