Millionaire Brexit campaigner Arron Banks says Brexit is 'getting very tedious' and he might quit politics

Rob Price
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  • Multi-millionaire Brexit campaigner Arron Banks thinks Brexit is "getting very tedious."
  • The Leave.EU founder and former Brexit donor now claims he might quit politics altogether.
  • He's currently under scrutiny following revelations of previously undisclosed meetings between him and the Russian ambassador to the UK.


Arron Banks, the multi-millionaire businessman-turned-political donor who spent millions of pounds campaigning for Britain to leave the European Union, says Brexit is "getting very tedious" — and that he might leave politics altogether.

Speaking to The Guardian's Jim Waterson on Wednesday, the Leave.EU campaign group founder decried the current state of Brexit negotiations and defended himself following days of bruising headlines over his connections to Russia.

Over the weekend, news broke that Banks and fellow Brexit advocate Andy Wigmore had held previously undisclosed meetings with the Russian ambassador in the UK, and that he had engaged in talks about potential gold mining business opportunities in the country.

The revelations sparked immediate questions about what, if any, involvement Russia had in the Brexit campaign, and this week the duo denied taking money from Russia and appeared before a Parliamentary committee. 

"That could be our last day in politics," he told The Guardian. "That could be the zenith."

Banks was also critical of the Brexit process that his funding helped put in motion, saying: "From our point of view, the referendum stuff is slowly grinding towards a conclusion in the most painful horrible way ... We’re a bit exhausted."

He added: "This Brexit stuff is all getting very tedious."

It may be prudent, however, to take Arron Banks' remarks with a pinch of salt. When testifying before the Parliamentary committee, he admitted to lying to journalists to get publicity during the EU referendum — casting potential doubt over the truthfulness of his new statements. 

On Wednesday evening, Theresa May managed to avoid defeats on key portions of her Brexit policy after a majority of MPs voted with the UK government to defeat amendments that would have undermined her positions on the single market and a customs union. It comes after Theresa May backed down on Tuesday and agreed to give MPs greater control over the Brexit process.

Jeremy Corbyn, meanwhile, faced Labour's largest rebellion over Brexit yet, with six MPs resigning from senior roles on Wednesday to oppose the party line on the issue. 

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