Train strikes: When are they this week, why are they happening, and which services are affected?

·4-min read
Train strikes: When are they this week, why are they happening, and which services are affected?

Railway workers are striking on a number of days in August in a dispute over pay and working conditions.

Members of the RMT, ASLEF, and TSSA unions are walking out, following industrial action in June and July.

RMT general secretary Mick Lynch said that “this dispute will not simply vanish,” and urged the rail industry and the government to “get serious about providing an offer on pay which helps deal with the cost-of-living crisis, job security for our members and provides good conditions at work.”

Mick Whelan, general secretary of ASLEF, said the union members had “been forced into this position by the train companies, driven by the Tory government,” and that “strike action is, now, the only option available.”

On Thursday and Saturday, only around a fifth of normal services will run, and half of lines will be closed.

Find out below when the next train strikes are and which services will be affected.

When are the next train strikes in 2022 and which companies are affected?

There are train strikes planned on August 13, August 18, and August 20, following the strikes on July 27 and July 30.

Train drivers at nine rail companies are to strike over pay, their union Aslef announced. The companies affected by this industrial action will be Arriva Rail London, Chiltern Railways, Greater Anglia, Great Western, Hull Trains, LNER, Southeastern, London Overground, and West Midlands Trains.

There are set to be further RMT strikes on August 18 and 20.

The companies affected by this strike will be Network Rail, Chiltern Railways, Cross Country Trains, Greater Anglia, LNER, East Midlands Railway, c2c, Great Western Railway, Northern Trains, South Eastern, South Western Railway, Transpennine Express, Avanti West Coast, West Midlands Trains, London Overground, and GTR (including Gatwick Express).

South Western Railway has urged customers to only travel by rail between August 18 and 21 if absolutely necessary. Parts of the network will be closed entirely, while there will be a reduced service between 7.15am and 6.30pm on a limited number of routes.

SWR’s reduced timetable will run from 07:15 to 18:30 on the 18 and 20 August strike days, and they have said the following:

  • SWR customers are urged only to travel by rail if absolutely necessary between 18 and 21 August

  • SWR will run a severely reduced service on Thursday 18 August and Saturday 20 August, with significant parts of the network closed entirely

  • The severely reduced service will run between 07:15 and 18:30 on a limited number of routes for those who have no choice but to travel

  • Friday 19 and Sunday 21 August will be significantly impacted by the strike; first trains across the network will start much later than usual

Trains will not stop at all the stations on these routes. There will be no SWR services across the rest of the network.

Furthermore, union members at seven train services including Northern and Greater Anglia have served notice of strikes on August 18 and 20.

The TSSA has served notice for strikes in seven train operating companies in the rail industry dispute over pay, job security and conditions.

Additionally, London Underground and Overground workers will strike on August 19, while London bus drivers will walk out on the same day in a separate strike.

UK Train & Tube Strike | June 2022

Passengers arrive at Kings Cross Station, London, as train services continue to be disrupted following the nationwide strike by members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union along with London Underground workers in a bitter dispute over pay, jobs and conditions (PA)
Passengers arrive at Kings Cross Station, London, as train services continue to be disrupted following the nationwide strike by members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union along with London Underground workers in a bitter dispute over pay, jobs and conditions (PA)
Commuters on the Central Line at Stratford Station (Getty Images)
Commuters on the Central Line at Stratford Station (Getty Images)
Passengers wait for Stratford station to open in London, as train services continue to be disrupted following the nationwide strike by members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union along with London Underground workers in a bitter dispute over pay, jobs and conditions (PA)
Passengers wait for Stratford station to open in London, as train services continue to be disrupted following the nationwide strike by members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union along with London Underground workers in a bitter dispute over pay, jobs and conditions (PA)
Traffic on the A1203 near Kings Cross in London, as train services continue to be disrupted following the nationwide strike by members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union in a bitter dispute over pay, jobs and conditions. (PA)
Traffic on the A1203 near Kings Cross in London, as train services continue to be disrupted following the nationwide strike by members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union in a bitter dispute over pay, jobs and conditions. (PA)
People walk on London Bridge, the day after a national rail strike, during six days of travel disruption (REUTERS)
People walk on London Bridge, the day after a national rail strike, during six days of travel disruption (REUTERS)
Passengers wait for Stratford station to open in London (PA)
Passengers wait for Stratford station to open in London (PA)
Commuters arrive at Stratford Station (Getty Images)
Commuters arrive at Stratford Station (Getty Images)
People walk on London Bridge in view of The Shard, the day after a national rail strike, during six days of travel disruption (REUTERS)
People walk on London Bridge in view of The Shard, the day after a national rail strike, during six days of travel disruption (REUTERS)
Passengers await their trains to be announced, at a quiet Euston station, in Londo (AP)
Passengers await their trains to be announced, at a quiet Euston station, in Londo (AP)
A group of passengers board a number 87 double-decker bus to Aldwych at a stop outside Clapham Junction station (PA)
A group of passengers board a number 87 double-decker bus to Aldwych at a stop outside Clapham Junction station (PA)
(Supplied)
(Supplied)

Strikes on Thursday, August 18 and Saturday, August 20:

Union members will go on strike again on the following rail services:

  • Avanti West Coast

  • C2C

  • Chiltern Railways

  • Cross Country Trains

  • East Midlands Railway

  • Gatwick Express

  • Great Western Railway

  • Greater Anglia

  • LNER

  • Northern Trains

  • Southeastern

  • South Western Railway

  • Southern

  • Thameslink

  • West Midlands Trains

  • TransPennine Express

  • London Underground (19 August)

Which London Overground services are impacted?

London Overground services did not run on August 13 and will not again on August 19.

Why are there train strikes?

The RMT is striking in a dispute over “job security, pay and working conditions.”

RMT’s Mick Lynch said: “Recent proposals from Network Rail fell well short on pay and on safety around maintenance work. And the train operating companies have not even made us a pay offer in recent negotiations.”

ASLEF’s Mick Whelan said: “The drivers at the companies where we are striking have had a real terms pay cut over the last three years—since April 2019.

“And these companies are offering us nothing, saying their hands have been tied by the government.

“That means, in real terms, with inflation running ahead at 9%, 10%, and even 11% this year, according to which index you use, that they are being told to take a real terms pay cut. And that is not acceptable.”

He added: “Strikes are always the last resort.

“We don’t want to inconvenience passengers - our friends and families use public transport too - and we don’t want to lose money by going on strike but we’ve been forced into this position by the companies, who say they have been driven to this by the Government.”

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