‘No fuss’ funeral was perfect for Philip, says Tindall

Tony Jones
·2-min read

Watch: Prince Philip’s funeral was exactly 'how he would have liked it'

The Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral was perfectly judged to honour the memory of a man who believed in “no fuss”, said Mike Tindall.

The former England rugby player, who is married to the Queen’s granddaughter Zara Tindall, said his admiration for the monarch has increased after she sat on her own in St George’s Chapel, leading “by example” in a world where social distancing is now the norm.

Tindall’s comments came after it was confirmed the Duke of Sussex has returned home to California after joining the small group of mourners at Philip’s funeral on Saturday.

Duke of Edinburgh funeral
The Buglers of the Royal Marines during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh (Danny Lawson/PA)

Speaking on his rugby podcast The Good, The Bad And The Rugby, the ex-sportsman said: “Look it’s been a difficult 10 days, and I look back on the day (and) I think as eerie as it was, with no crowds and the social distancing and the way everything was, I think it was the perfect day – how he would have liked it – if that makes any sense whatsoever.

“No fuss, get on with it.

“My love for the Queen was even better, she was sat there completely on her own. Separated herself in terms of, ‘this is what the world is right now, and I’m going to lead by example’ and she’s amazing, literally amazing.”

During the funeral there were simple touches that reflected Philip – his carriage, used for racing around courses, was parked so it was passed by the funeral procession.

On his seat were the duke’s cap, whip and brown gloves and nearby a red pot containing sugar lumps the duke would give to his ponies.

Duke of Edinburgh funeral
The Land Rover Defender carrying the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh with senior royals following (Leon Neal/PA)

Philip’s coffin, draped with his personal standard, featured his Admiral of the Fleet Naval cap and sword next to a wreath of white flowers chosen by the Queen with a handwritten card, edged in black, from his wife of 73 years.

During the service, a mournful lament was played by a Pipe Major from the Royal Regiment of Scotland and the Last Post was sounded by buglers from the Royal Marines.

Tindall said these elements of the day were “eerie moments for the family” and “there were a lot of things that brought home memories”.

He added: “It was a sad day but, you know, I think it was very well run and he was very well looked after and hopefully he’s looking down now and is happy with the day.”

Watch: Prince Harry returns to US