OPINION - Talking Point: Do you support the expansion of LTNs across London?

A young cyclist passes through the barriers that form a Low Traffic Neighbourhood (Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images)
A young cyclist passes through the barriers that form a Low Traffic Neighbourhood (Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images)

Hackney Council has signed off a three-year plan that it says will result in the largest number of car restrictions, public electric-vehicle chargers, and cycle parking of anywhere in London.

Around half of the roads in Hackney are already covered by traffic-management measures but, under the new proposals, 75 per cent of its roads will have Low Traffic Neighbourhoods (LTNs) installed by 2026.

A recent study by Westminster University’s Active Travel Academy and climate charity Possible found the measures in place in London “substantially” reduced motor traffic in residential areas without having much impact on nearby main roads.

However, a residents’ group has criticised this report.

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Mayor Philip Glanville has praised it as “the most ambitious plan in London”; other areas may yet follow suit.

Do you support the expansion of LTNs across London? Let us know in the comments or on our Instagram for your chance to be featured on the ES website.

Yesterday we asked: Should women be entitled to menopause leave?

The idea proved to be divisive with our readers on social media.

Eve Kane replied on Facebook: “Yes, but without pay.”

Ronelle Wentzel said: “100%! Being able to work from home has been a saving grace for me. From what I’ve seen on Facebook groups some women have horrendous symptoms. The same for some women when it’s their time of the month because of misdiagnosis from doctors which has happened to two friends recently who both need surgery and been struggling for years with horrendous pain.”

Bridget Brown commented: “I don’t agree with time off necessarily as it can last for years and be a costly expense especially for very small companies, but just more understanding in the workplace. For example when sat in face to face meetings and you experience a hot flush it would be nice to excuse yourself to go and cool down without feeling awkward! The more it’s discussed openly the more allowances can be made in the workplace.”

Gail Jones reacted to the Government rejecting a number of proposals concerning menopause: “As usual mainly men deciding what is best for women.”

Among opposition to the idea, Julia Collingham replied: “Definitely not. Though having to work through with all the usual horrid symptoms in a demanding job it was better than being stuck at home where you’d dwell on it more.”

On Instagram, lin_whitehouse suggested: “It should be absorbed into a woman’s every day life not become an exceptional part of it.”

fabnad2 couldn’t see the idea of menopause leave working: “What? For all 10 years of night sweats/flushes? Ridiculous idea.”