Which prime ministers have served second terms after being removed?

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A petition is demanding that Boris Johnson serve a second term (Stefan Rousseau/PA) (PA Wire)
A petition is demanding that Boris Johnson serve a second term (Stefan Rousseau/PA) (PA Wire)

Over 10,000 Conservative party members have signed a petition to demand Boris Johnson is added to the Tory leadership race ballot paper, as calls grow for him to remain Prime Minister.

Johnson is set to be replaced by either Rishi Sunak or Liz Truss on September 6, after a winner announcement the previous day, but former Tory MEP David Campbell Bannerman says it would be “suicidal” for the party if Mr Johnson left Downing Street.

Campbell Bannerman, who set up the petition alongside Conservative peer Lord Cruddas, said replacing the PM would be “guaranteeing a Labour victory” at the next election.

The petition, on conservativepost.co.uk says the people who ousted him may have had “vested interest reasons” to do so and “the membership are very upset about what has happened to our elected leader”.

It adds: “I demand Boris Johnson is added to the ballot as an option for the members to vote upon in the forthcoming election.”

But, which prime ministers have served second terms after leaving number 10? Here’s everything you need to know.

Which prime ministers have served second terms after leaving number 10?

Only two Prime Ministers have served second terms after being removed: Labour’s Harold Wilson, and Conservative Winston Churchill.

During his final PMQs, Mr Johnson made the comment “Hasta la vista,” which translates to ‘see you later’ in Spanish, which many believe indicates a desire to return to 10 Downing Street.

“Hasta la vista,” which translates to ‘see you later’ in Spanish, was his final remark in the Commons last Wednesday, and earlier at Prime Minister’s Questions he said his mission in government was “accomplished for now”.

Asked about the comments at the time, his press secretary did not explicitly deny he may be planning a return to Downing Street, as she replied: “That was his way of saying farewell to his colleagues.”

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